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Anita B. Roberts Lecture 2016: Functional Architecture of Face Processing in the Primate Brain

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Air date: Tuesday, May 10, 2016, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 106, (55 Live, 51 On-demand)
Category: Anita B. Roberts - Distinguished Women Scientists
Runtime: 01:05:48
Description: Women Scientists Advisory - Anita B. Roberts Annual Lecture

Face recognition is a remarkable ability, given the tens of thousands of different faces we can recognize, sometimes even many years later after a single encounter. Because of this unique ability, it has been proposed that there may exist specialized neural machinery dedicated to face recognition, as compared to the recognition of non-face objects. The current talk describes recent brain imaging studies exploring the functional architecture of face processing in the primate brain. The talk will focus on the network dynamics mediating the discrimination and recognition of both face identity and facial expression. Such dynamics involve interactions among specialized face-selective regions in the ventral temporal and prefrontal cortices as well as in the amygdala. The talk will also highlight evidence for a neurobiological explanation of developmental prosopagnosia, an inherited, congenital impairment in the visual recognition of familiar faces in the absence of any structural brain damage.
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NLM Title: Functional architecture of face processing in the primate brain / Leslie G. Ungerleider.
Author: Ungerleider, Leslie G.
NIH Women Scientist Advisors Committee,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Women Scientists Advisory - Anita B. Roberts Annual Lecture Face recognition is a remarkable ability, given the tens of thousands of different faces we can recognize, sometimes even many years later after a single encounter. Because of this unique ability, it has been proposed that there may exist specialized neural machinery dedicated to face recognition, as compared to the recognition of non-face objects. The current talk describes recent brain imaging studies exploring the functional architecture of face processing in the primate brain. The talk will focus on the network dynamics mediating the discrimination and recognition of both face identity and facial expression. Such dynamics involve interactions among specialized face-selective regions in the ventral temporal and prefrontal cortices as well as in the amygdala. The talk will also highlight evidence for a neurobiological explanation of developmental prosopagnosia, an inherited, congenital impairment in the visual recognition of familiar faces in the absence of any structural brain damage.
Subjects: Brain--physiology
Face
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Primates--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QP 376
NLM ID: 101684396
CIT Live ID: 17972
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19674