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Wildlife Surveillance: Early Warning System for Ebola, Avian Flu and other Disease Outbreaks

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Air date: Thursday, April 5, 2007, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 54 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: Special
Runtime: 01:11:30
Description: The Emergency Preparedness and Biodefense Interest Group

Dr. Karesh heads the field veterinary program of the Wildlife Conservation Society, which has over 300 field projects in 50 countries around the world. His teams of veterinarians study the health status of free-ranging wildlife populations, focusing on the risk of transfer of infectious agents among wild and domestic animals and humans. WCS staff have been especially active in monitoring the spread of Ebola virus in Gabon and the Republic of Congo, where they have characterized recent die-offs of infected gorillas and chimpanzees and assessed the risks of human exposure. The society also plays a major role in monitoring the spread of H5N1 influenza virus in wild birds, and spearheads the Global Avian Influenza Network for Surveillance (GAINS).

http://tango01.cit.nih.gov/sig/home.taf?_function=main&SIGInfo_SIGID=136
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NLM Title: Wildlife surveillance : early warning system for Ebola, avian flu, and other disease outbreaks [electronic resource] / Billy Karesh.
Author: Karesh, Billy.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Emergency Preparedness and Biodefense Interest Group.
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): The Emergency Preparedness and Biodefense Interest Group. Dr. Karesh heads the field veterinary program of the Wildlife Conservation Society, which has over 300 field projects in 50 countries around the world. His teams of veterinarians study the health status of free-ranging wildlife populations, focusing on the risk of transfer of infectious agents among wild and domestic animals and humans. WCS staff have been especially active in monitoring the spread of Ebola virus in Gabon and the Republic of Congo, where they have characterized recent die-offs of infected gorillas and chimpanzees and assessed the risks of human exposure. The society also plays a major role in monitoring the spread of H5N1 influenza virus in wild birds, and spearheads the Global Avian Influenza Network for Surveillance (GAINS).
Subjects: Animals, Wild
Communicable Disease Control--methods
Disease Outbreaks--prevention & control
Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola--transmission
Influenza in Birds--transmission
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Rights: This is a work of the United States Government.
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[384k]    How to download a Videocast
NLM Classification: WA 110
NLM ID: 101306059
CIT Live ID: 5768
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?13744