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In Search of the Holy Grail of Fly Motion Vision

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Air date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 219 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:59:55
Description: Neurons responding to moving stimuli in a directionally selective way are found in the visual systems of almost all species, yet the underlying neural mechanisms and circuits giving rise to this particular response property are still elusive. In the fly, large motion-sensitive neurons located in the so-called ' lobula plate' respond to optic flow stimuli. These cells receive input from a retinotopically organized array of local motion-sensitive elements which are described in quantitative detail by a formal model called the 'Reichardt detector'. However, despite decades of research, it is still not known what neurons constitute the Reichardt detector and what biophysical mechanisms underlie the mathematical operations postulated in this model. Thus, the neural implementation of the Reichardt detector somehow became the 'holy grail' of fly motion vision. The talk will summarize some recent progress made along this direction, using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and combining electrophysiology with the powerful genetics available in this organism.

The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
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NLM Title: In search of the holy grail of fly motion vision [electronic resource] / Alexander Borst.
Series: NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Author: Borst, Alexander.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Abstract: (CIT): Neurons responding to moving stimuli in a directionally selective way are found in the visual systems of almost all species, yet the underlying neural mechanisms and circuits giving rise to this particular response property are still elusive. In the fly, large motion-sensitive neurons located in the so-called ' lobula plate' respond to optic flow stimuli. These cells receive input from a retinotopically organized array of local motion-sensitive elements which are described in quantitative detail by a formal model called the 'Reichardt detector'. However, despite decades of research, it is still not known what neurons constitute the Reichardt detector and what biophysical mechanisms underlie the mathematical operations postulated in this model. Thus, the neural implementation of the Reichardt detector somehow became the 'holy grail' of fly motion vision. The talk will summarize some recent progress made along this direction, using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and combining electrophysiology with the powerful genetics available in this organism. The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
Subjects: Diptera--physiology
Motion Perception--physiology
Optic Lobe, Nonmammalian--physiology
Visual Perception--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QX 505
NLM ID: 101559801
CIT Live ID: 10065
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?16532

 

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