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The plasticity and migratory responses of innate lymphoid cells: more similarity to T cells than you thought

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Air date: Wednesday, June 7, 2017, 4:15:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 159, (37 Live, 122 On-demand)
Category: Immunology
Runtime: 00:49:44
Description: Immunology Interest Group Seminar Series

The identification of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) was a major step forward in developing a better understanding of host defense. Although ILC lack the capacity for antigen recognition, they show striking similarities with T cell subsets in both the transcription factors that govern their differentiation and the effector cytokines they produce. One major difference in the existing concepts of ILC and adaptive T cell responses is that the former are considered to act largely as tissue resident effectors whereas T cells migrate from secondary lymphoid tissues of activation to peripheral tissue locations where they mediate effector activity. However, our studies suggest that ILCs may share a greater relationship with T cells in terms of biology than previously considered. Our analysis of inflammatory ILC2 cells revealed that after activation in the intestinal lamina propria upon IL-25, these iILC2s entered the lymphatic and then blood circulation in an S1P-depndent manner, migrating to lung and other peripheral sites where they mediate crucial protection during helminthic infection. These data suggest that the current paradigm of local activation and distant function for T cell-mediated immunity actually borrows from a mode of operation already present in innate lymphoid cell populations prior to development of antigen specific host defenses.

Yuefeng “Tony” Huang obtained his PhD degree from Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, where he studied the cross talking between apoptosis and antiviral responses. He joined Laboratory of Immunology, NIAID in 2012 as a postdoctoral fellow. He has studied the biology of innate lymphoid cells under the mentorship of Bill Paul and then Ron Germain, and he is an awardee of K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Grant. In his seminar, Tony will present his journey from identification of “inflammatory ILC2” and its plasticity to his more recent discovery that inflammatory ILC2s are not tissue resident but circulating cells, which arise from the gut but can offer crucial protection in the lung during helminthic infection.
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NLM Title: The plasticity and migratory responses of innate lymphoid cells : more similarity to T cells than you thought / Yuefeng "Tony" Huang ; Immunology Interest Group.
Author: Huang, Yuefeng.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Immunology Interest Group,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Immunology Interest Group Seminar Series. The identification of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) was a major step forward in developing a better understanding of host defense. Although ILC lack the capacity for antigen recognition, they show striking similarities with T cell subsets in both the transcription factors that govern their differentiation and the effector cytokines they produce. One major difference in the existing concepts of ILC and adaptive T cell responses is that the former are considered to act largely as tissue resident effectors whereas T cells migrate from secondary lymphoid tissues of activation to peripheral tissue locations where they mediate effector activity. However, our studies suggest that ILCs may share a greater relationship with T cells in terms of biology than previously considered. Our analysis of inflammatory ILC2 cells revealed that after activation in the intestinal lamina propria upon IL-25, these iILC2s entered the lymphatic and then blood circulation in an S1P-depndent manner, migrating to lung and other peripheral sites where they mediate crucial protection during helminthic infection. These data suggest that the current paradigm of local activation and distant function for T cell-mediated immunity actually borrows from a mode of operation already present in innate lymphoid cell populations prior to development of antigen specific host defenses. Yuefeng "Tony" Huang obtained his PhD degree from Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, where he studied the cross talking between apoptosis and antiviral responses. He joined Laboratory of Immunology, NIAID in 2012 as a postdoctoral fellow. He has studied the biology of innate lymphoid cells under the mentorship of Bill Paul and then Ron Germain, and he is an awardee of K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Grant. In his seminar, Tony will present his journey from identification of "inflammatory ILC2" and its plasticity to his more recent discovery that inflammatory ILC2s are not tissue resident but circulating cells, which arise from the gut but can offer crucial protection in the lung during helminthic infection.
Subjects: Immunity, Innate--physiology
Lymphocytes--immunology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: QW 568
NLM ID: 101708391
CIT Live ID: 18598
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23344