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Anita Roberts Lecture: The hidden secrets of small genes

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Air date: Tuesday, May 16, 2017, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 110, (62 Live, 48 On-demand)
Category: Anita B. Roberts - Distinguished Women Scientists
Runtime: 01:05:04
Description: Women Scientists Advisory WSA

Anita Roberts Lecture

The hidden secrets of small genes

One major focus of our research has been the identification and characterization of small, regulatory RNAs in E. coli. Similar to eukaryotic miRNAs, many of these bacterial RNAs act by base pairing with mRNA targets to modulate mRNA stability and translation and are integral to most regulatory networks. Interestingly, while it was initially assumed these small RNAs are encoded as independent genes, recent studies have shown that many small RNAs are derived from the 3’ end of protein coding genes and the distinction between coding and noncoding is becoming increasingly blurred. A second major focus is the identification and characterization of small proteins of less than 50 amino acids, another overlooked class of biological molecules. Recent studies show that a major function of these small proteins, in both bacteria and eukaryotes, is regulating transporters and other large proteins in the membrane.
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NLM Title: The hidden secrets of small genes / Gisela Storz.
Author: Storz, Gisela.
NIH Women Scientist Advisors Committee,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Women Scientists Advisory WSA Anita Roberts Lecture The hidden secrets of small genes One major focus of our research has been the identification and characterization of small, regulatory RNAs in E. coli. Similar to eukaryotic miRNAs, many of these bacterial RNAs act by base pairing with mRNA targets to modulate mRNA stability and translation and are integral to most regulatory networks. Interestingly, while it was initially assumed these small RNAs are encoded as independent genes, recent studies have shown that many small RNAs are derived from the 3" end of protein coding genes and the distinction between coding and noncoding is becoming increasingly blurred. A second major focus is the identification and characterization of small proteins of less than 50 amino acids, another overlooked class of biological molecules. Recent studies show that a major function of these small proteins, in both bacteria and eukaryotes, is regulating transporters and other large proteins in the membrane.
Subjects: Base Pairing--physiology
Escherichia coli--genetics
Gene Regulatory Networks--physiology
Genes, Regulator--physiology
Proteins--genetics
RNA, Bacterial--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
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NLM Classification: QW 138.5.E8
NLM ID: 101706995
CIT Live ID: 22087
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23286