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Stereotyped Spatial Orientation of the Retinotopically-ordered Retinal Projection Fields: A Prosomeric Model Analysis

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Air date: Monday, April 9, 2012, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 108, (12 Live, 96 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 01:16:53
Description: Neuroscience Seminar Series

Prof. Puelles is a developmental neurobiologist who has been at the forefront of efforts to understand the ontological trajectory of the vertebrate brain using, for example, the expression of transcription factors at different embryonic stages of development. Some examples of his work include the use of gene expression patterns to characterize the segmental organization of the forebrain in the so-called "prosomeric model" (Puelles and Rubenstein, 2003). His work has also elucidated the developmental organization and fate-mapping of the telencephalic vesicles, which ultimately form the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, septum, amygdala, basal ganglia (Puelles,2011). Much of his work has focused on the pallial and subpallial components that contribute to various telencephalic structures, such as the septum and amygdala in mammals and the dorsal ventricular ridge in sauropsids (Puelles, 2001a, 2001b). His work has broad and important implications for understanding the overall organization and connectivity of large-scale neural systems in the vertebrate brain, including that of humans. Understanding the basic Bauplan of the brain serves as a critical backdrop for understanding normal brain function as well as dysfunction associated with neurological and psychiatric disease.

For more information go to http://neuroseries.info.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Stereotyped spatial orientation of the retinotopically-ordered retinal projection fields : a prosomeric model analysis [electronic resource] / Luis Puelles.
Series: Neuroscience seminar series
Author: Puelles, L.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Neuroscience seminar series
Abstract: Prof. Puelles is a developmental neurobiologist who has been at the forefront of efforts to understand the ontological trajectory of the vertebrate brain using, for example, the expression of transcription factors at different embryonic stages of development. Some examples of his work include the use of gene expression patterns to characterize the segmental organization of the forebrain in the so-called "prosomeric model" (Puelles and Rubenstein, 2003). His work has also elucidated the developmental organization and fate-mapping of the telencephalic vesicles, which ultimately form the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, septum, amygdala, basal ganglia (Puelles,2011). Much of his work has focused on the pallial and subpallial components that contribute to various telencephalic structures, such as the septum and amygdala in mammals and the dorsal ventricular ridge in sauropsids (Puelles, 2001a, 2001b). His work has broad and important implications for understanding the overall organization and connectivity of large-scale neural systems in the vertebrate brain, including that of humans. Understanding the basic Bauplan of the brain serves as a critical backdrop for understanding normal brain function as well as dysfunction associated with neurological and psychiatric disease.
Subjects: Brain Mapping
Models, Neurological
Prosencephalon--metabolism
Retina--physiology
Space Perception--physiology
Visual Fields--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WW 270
NLM ID: 101585223
CIT Live ID: 10983
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?17202