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Toward a Universal Influenza Virus Vaccine

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Air date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 373 (141 Live, 232 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:51:42
Description: Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Because influenza viruses are constantly changing, it's difficult to develop effective vaccines against them. Two molecules on the surface of the virus control its infectivity: hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Current influenza virus vaccines predominantly elicit a protective immune response to the immunodominant but variable head of the hemagglutinin. This approach is effective, especially when the vaccine strain closely matches the circulating virus. Another vaccine strategy involves redirecting the response to the more conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin and the immunosubdominant neuraminidase. This can be achieved by using vaccine strains that express chimeric hemagglutinin proteins whereby the head of the hemagglutinin represents an exotic subtype never encountered by humans under natural conditions. Such influenza virus constructs are likely to boost memory B-cells directed against conserved epitopes of the hemagglutinin stalk and the neuraminidase, and thus should afford broad spectrum protection against a variety of antigenic drift and shift strains.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Toward a universal influenza virus vaccine / Peter Palese.
Author: Palese, Peter.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Because influenza viruses are constantly changing, it's difficult to develop effective vaccines against them. Two molecules on the surface of the virus control its infectivity: hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Current influenza virus vaccines predominantly elicit a protective immune response to the immunodominant but variable head of the hemagglutinin. This approach is effective, especially when the vaccine strain closely matches the circulating virus. Another vaccine strategy involves redirecting the response to the more conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin and the immunosubdominant neuraminidase. This can be achieved by using vaccine strains that express chimeric hemagglutinin proteins whereby the head of the hemagglutinin represents an exotic subtype never encountered by humans under natural conditions. Such influenza virus constructs are likely to boost memory B-cells directed against conserved epitopes of the hemagglutinin stalk and the neuraminidase, and thus should afford broad spectrum protection against a variety of antigenic drift and shift strains.
Subjects: Influenza A virus--genetics
Influenza Vaccines--therapeutic use
Influenza, Human--immunology
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WC 515
NLM ID: 101634124
CIT Live ID: 14094
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=14094