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Tribal Ecological Knowledge Workshop (Day 1)

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Air date: Thursday, December 3, 2015, 8:30:00 AM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 251, (86 Live, 165 On-demand)
Category: Conferences
Runtime: 05:41:43
Description: The Tribal Ecological Knowledge (TEK) workshop will explore the contributions that Native American (NA) and Alaskan Native (AN) tribal communities bring to the research enterprise. This workshop will focus on the value of TEK for environmental health sciences (EHS) and biomedical research. The term TEK denotes "traditional knowledge [that], like Western science, is based on accumulation of observation. It is knowledge that is transmitted through generations, practice in how tribes carry out resource use practices, and beliefs about how people fit into ecosystems" (Berkes, 2000). The term is widely used by tribal communities to denote a range of factors affecting Native health from an indigenous perspective. We propose that TEK is a culturally appropriate form of community-engaged research that could benefit biomedical research focused on environmental factors affecting health, and may also be a way to increase trust and mutual respect in tribal-academic partnership. In addition, we believe that TEK is an example of citizen science, which we would like to highlight due to the increased attention to citizen science as a viable element of research among researchers and federal agencies. The workshop goals are to explore ways to improve trust in academic-tribal research; to identify methods for incorporating community-acquired data and local TEK into environmental health and biomedical research studies; to consider ethical approaches for tribal specific data collection; and to build capacity to respond to long term and immediate disaster events. This workshop has been organized by representatives of seven tribal communities working with NIH (NIEHS and NIMHD), Indian Health Service, Smithsonian Museums, and CDC/ATSDR staff. We believe that hosting a workshop around the theme of TEK will raise awareness of the importance of this type of contribution to research and garner input from those with expertise in TEK to identify the optimal ways to incorporate it into research.

For more information go to http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/conference/tek_workshop_2015/index.cfm
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NLM Title: Tribal Ecological Knowledge Workshop / National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH.
Author: Tribal Ecological Knowledge Workshop
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): The Tribal Ecological Knowledge (TEK) workshop will explore the contributions that Native American (NA) and Alaskan Native (AN) tribal communities bring to the research enterprise. This workshop will focus on the value of TEK for environmental health sciences (EHS) and biomedical research. The term TEK denotes "traditional knowledge [that], like Western science, is based on accumulation of observation. It is knowledge that is transmitted through generations, practice in how tribes carry out resource use practices, and beliefs about how people fit into ecosystems" (Berkes, 2000). The term is widely used by tribal communities to denote a range of factors affecting Native health from an indigenous perspective. We propose that TEK is a culturally appropriate form of community-engaged research that could benefit biomedical research focused on environmental factors affecting health, and may also be a way to increase trust and mutual respect in tribal-academic partnership. In addition, we believe that TEK is an example of citizen science, which we would like to highlight due to the increased attention to citizen science as a viable element of research among researchers and federal agencies. The workshop goals are to explore ways to improve trust in academic-tribal research; to identify methods for incorporating community-acquired data and local TEK into environmental health and biomedical research studies; to consider ethical approaches for tribal specific data collection; and to build capacity to respond to long term and immediate disaster events. This workshop has been organized by representatives of seven tribal communities working with NIH (NIEHS and NIMHD), Indian Health Service, Smithsonian Museums, and CDC/ATSDR staff. We believe that hosting a workshop around the theme of TEK will raise awareness of the importance of this type of contribution to research and garner input from those with expertise in TEK to identify the optimal ways to incorporate it into research.
Subjects: Biomedical Research
Ecosystem
Environmental Health
Health Services, Indigenous
Indians, North American--ethnology
Interdisciplinary Communication
United States--ethnology
Publication Types: Congresses
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: WA 300 AA1
NLM ID: 101674296
CIT Live ID: 17573
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19366