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Tracing the Evolution of Adaptive Immunity

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Air date: Wednesday, February 4, 2015, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 393, (166 Live, 227 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:55:45
Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture

A search for the origin of our adaptive immune system has revealed that the jawed vertebrates and jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfish) use different strategies for generating large repertoires of lymphocyte receptors for antigens. Whereas lymphocytes in jawed vertebrates undergo RAG-mediated recombinatorial assembly of immunoglobulin V, D, and J gene segments to generate diverse T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoires, lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments as templates to complete the assembly of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Three VLR loci (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC) undergo independent assembly during the differentiation of three distinct lymphocyte lineages. The VLRA-bearing and VLRC-bearing lymphocytes have genetic programs and phenotypic characteristics that resemble those of certain T cells of jawed vertebrates, whereas the VLRB-bearing cells resemble B cells. Dr. Cooper’s lab concludes that the basic genetic programs for the T- and B-cell lineages were already present in a common vertebrate ancestor more than 500 million years ago, prior to the convergent evolution of different types of anticipatory receptors.
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NLM Title: Tracing the evolution of adaptive immunity / Max D. Cooper.
Author: Cooper, Max D.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): A search for the origin of our adaptive immune system has revealed that the jawed vertebrates and jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfish) use different strategies for generating large repertoires of lymphocyte receptors for antigens. Whereas lymphocytes in jawed vertebrates undergo RAG-mediated recombinatorial assembly of immunoglobulin V, D, and J gene segments to generate diverse T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoires, lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments as templates to complete the assembly of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Three VLR loci (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC) undergo independent assembly during the differentiation of three distinct lymphocyte lineages. The VLRA-bearing and VLRC-bearing lymphocytes have genetic programs and phenotypic characteristics that resemble those of certain T cells of jawed vertebrates, whereas the VLRB-bearing cells resemble B cells. Dr. Cooper's lab concludes that the basic genetic programs for the T- and B-cell lineages were already present in a common vertebrate ancestor more than 500 million years ago, prior to the convergent evolution of different types of anticipatory receptors.
Subjects: Adaptive Immunity--genetics
Adaptive Immunity--immunology
Biological Evolution
Lymphocytes--immunology
Receptors, Immunologic
Publication Types: Lecture
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NLM Classification: QW 551
NLM ID: 101653998
CIT Live ID: 15687
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18835