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On the role of rat superior colliculus in cognitive control

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Air date: Monday, May 15, 2017, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 84, (24 Live, 60 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 01:11:00
Description: NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar

Dr. Brody’s lab uses a combination of computational, behavioral, and electrophysiological techniques. They train rats to perform tasks that require cognitive components that they are interested in studying. For example, they train them to remember a stimulus for a few seconds, and to then make a behavior based on their memory of the stimulus. They can then study neural responses during this behavior, and observe the neural correlates of short-term memory. To help them understand the mechanisms behind their findings, they build computational models of networks of spiking neurons, with which they explore the circuit architectures and mechanistic hypotheses that could explain the experimental results. The models both give them greater insight into potential mechanisms, and help them decide what are the best next experiments to test and distinguish between hypotheses.

Currently they are focused on three behavioral tasks performed by rats, all studied from the combined computational/experimental approach. The first is a task in which rats are presented with a first stimulus; then there is a pause; then they are presented with a second stimulus; and the rats must compare the two stimuli and make a binary decision based on the comparison. They use this task to study short-term memory and decision-making. In the second task, they study how it is that cognitive state can flexibly determine appropriate rules of behavior. The third task that they are working on is one where rats hear a sound, and must decide whether the sound was long or short. They are using this task to study the neural basis of time perception. But where in the brain is information about time processed and perceived? And how is time represented? These are some of the questions they are addressing with their time discrimination task.

For more information go to https://neuroscience.nih.gov/neuroseries/Home.aspx
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NLM Title: On the role of rat superior colliculus in cognitive control / Carlos D. Brody.
Author: Brody, Carlos.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar Dr. Brody"s lab uses a combination of computational, behavioral, and electrophysiological techniques. They train rats to perform tasks that require cognitive components that they are interested in studying. For example, they train them to remember a stimulus for a few seconds, and to then make a behavior based on their memory of the stimulus. They can then study neural responses during this behavior, and observe the neural correlates of short-term memory. To help them understand the mechanisms behind their findings, they build computational models of networks of spiking neurons, with which they explore the circuit architectures and mechanistic hypotheses that could explain the experimental results. The models both give them greater insight into potential mechanisms, and help them decide what are the best next experiments to test and distinguish between hypotheses. Currently they are focused on three behavioral tasks performed by rats, all studied from the combined computational/experimental approach. The first is a task in which rats are presented with a first stimulus; then there is a pause; then they are presented with a second stimulus; and the rats must compare the two stimuli and make a binary decision based on the comparison. They use this task to study short-term memory and decision-making. In the second task, they study how it is that cognitive state can flexibly determine appropriate rules of behavior. The third task that they are working on is one where rats hear a sound, and must decide whether the sound was long or short. They are using this task to study the neural basis of time perception. But where in the brain is information about time processed and perceived? And how is time represented? These are some of the questions they are addressing with their time discrimination task.
Subjects: Cognition--physiology
Memory, Short-Term--physiology
Models, Animal
Models, Neurological
Neural Conduction--physiology
Neural Pathways--physiology
Rats--psychology
Superior Colliculi--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WL 310
NLM ID: 101706994
CIT Live ID: 20270
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23285