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Germs, genes, and host defense

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Air date: Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 359, (133 Live, 226 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:59:34
Description: Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

The Human Functional Genomics Project (HFGP) is a large-scale project that aims to identify the consequences that genetic variation in human DNA and the complex colonization with microbial communities (microbiome) have on the physiological processes in the human body, with a special focus on the immune system in health and human diseases. HFGP includes different deeply phenotyped cohorts with multi-omics information such as transcriptional profiling, gut microbiota composition and extensive immune phenotyping.

For her lecture, Dr. Wijmenga will describe the potential of studying variation in the general population and the opportunities for translational research. She will also show how to make use of the LifeLines-deep cohort to establish what constitutes a "normal" gut microbiome and to show how microbiota composition correlates with a range of factors including diet, use of medication, and genetic factors. Her laboratory uses the 500 functional genomics (500FG) cohort to further characterize the interaction between the genetic background of the host, the gut microbiome composition, and the immune response against important human pathogens. The information from both LifeLines-deep and 500FG is subsequently used to identify genes that underlie the genetic susceptibility to systemic candida infections.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals/2016-2017
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NLM Title: Germs, genes, and host defense / Cisca Wijmenga.
Author: Wijmenga, Cisca.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The Human Functional Genomics Project (HFGP) is a large-scale project that aims to identify the consequences that genetic variation in human DNA and the complex colonization with microbial communities (microbiome) have on the physiological processes in the human body, with a special focus on the immune system in health and human diseases. HFGP includes different deeply phenotyped cohorts with multi-omics information such as transcriptional profiling, gut microbiota composition and extensive immune phenotyping. For her lecture, Dr. Wijmenga will describe the potential of studying variation in the general population and the opportunities for translational research. She will also show how to make use of the LifeLines-deep cohort to establish what constitutes a "normal" gut microbiome and to show how microbiota composition correlates with a range of factors including diet, use of medication, and genetic factors. Her laboratory uses the 500 functional genomics (500FG) cohort to further characterize the interaction between the genetic background of the host, the gut microbiome composition, and the immune response against important human pathogens. The information from both LifeLines-deep and 500FG is subsequently used to identify genes that underlie the genetic susceptibility to systemic candida infections.
Subjects: Candidemia--genetics
Cytokines--genetics
Gastrointestinal Microbiome--genetics
Gastrointestinal Tract
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: WI 100
NLM ID: 101697725
CIT Live ID: 20232
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?20009