Skip Navigation


CIT can broadcast your seminar, conference or meeting live to a world-wide audience over the Internet as a real-time streaming video. The event can be recorded and made available for viewers to watch at their convenience as an on-demand video or a downloadable file. CIT can also broadcast NIH-only or HHS-only content.

Genomics of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Loading video...

300 Views  
   
Air date: Friday, April 10, 2015, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 300, (60 Live, 240 On-demand)
Category: NIH Director's Seminars
Runtime: 00:46:12
Description: NIH Director's Seminar Series

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig’s disease) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that leads to rapidly progressive paralysis and respiratory failure. ALS is the third most common neurodegenerative disease in the Western World, and there are currently no effective therapies. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the most common form of dementia in the population under the age of 65. An overlap between these two clinically distinct neurological diseases has long been recognized, but the molecular basis of this intersection was unknown.

Recently, the Laboratory of Neurogenetics at the National Institute on Aging identified the major genetic cause of both ALS and FTD. To do this, Dr. Traynor organized a worldwide consortium, bringing together groups that had previously been competitors to focus their efforts towards identifying this gene. This was made possible by the next generation sequencing technologies available at the NIH. This innovative approach worked, and his group published the cause of chromosome 9-linked ALS/FTD in the journal Neuron in September 2011. In these cases, the disease is caused by a six base pair segment of DNA that is pathologically repeated over and over again, up to several thousand times. This so-called large hexanucleotide repeat disrupts the C9ORF72 gene located on chromosome 9. This is the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD identified to date, accounting for approximately 40% of all familial cases of ALS and FTD in European and North American populations. Further, Dr. Traynor’s group has shown that this mutation underlies about 8% of cases of sporadically occurring ALS and FTD that lack a family history. This represents the first time that a common genetic cause has been identified for the sporadic form of these diseases.

The discovery of the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion is a landmark discovery in our understanding of neurodegenerative disease. It has already greatly effected how these diseases are diagnosed, investigated and perceived, and provides a mechanistic link between two clinically distinct disorders, ALS and FTD. It also provides a distinct therapeutic target for gene therapy efforts aimed at ameliorating the disease, and such efforts are already well underway.
Debug: Show Debug
NLM Title: Genomics of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis / Bryan J. Traynor.
Author: Traynor, Bryan.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Director's Seminar Series Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig's disease) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that leads to rapidly progressive paralysis and respiratory failure. ALS is the third most common neurodegenerative disease in the western world, and there are currently no effective therapies. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the most common form of dementia in the population under the age of 65. An overlap between these two clinically distinct neurological diseases has long been recognized, but the molecular basis of this intersection was unknown. Recently, the Laboratory of Neurogenetics at the National Institute on Aging identified the major genetic cause of both ALS and FTD. To do this, Dr. Traynor organized a worldwide consortium, bringing together groups that had previously been competitors to focus their efforts towards identifying this gene. This was made possible by the next generation sequencing technologies available at the NIH. This innovative approach worked, and his group published the cause of chromosome 9-linked ALS/FTD in the journal Neuron in September 2011. In these cases, the disease is caused by a six base pair segment of DNA that is pathologically repeated over and over again, up to several thousand times. This so-called large hexanucleotide repeat disrupts the C9ORF72 gene located on chromosome 9. This is the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD identified to date, accounting for approximately 40% of all familial cases of ALS and FTD in European and North American populations. Further, Dr. Traynor"s group has shown that this mutation underlies about 8% of cases of sporadically occurring ALS and FTD that lack a family history. This represents the first time that a common genetic cause has been identified for the sporadic form of these diseases. The discovery of the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion is a landmark discovery in our understanding of neurodegenerative disease. It has already greatly effected how these diseases are diagnosed, investigated and perceived, and provides a mechanistic link between two clinically distinct disorders, ALS and FTD. It also provides a distinct therapeutic target for gene therapy efforts aimed at ameliorating the disease, and such efforts are already well underway.
Subjects: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis--genetics
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[64k]  [150k]  [240k]  [440k]  [740k]  [1040k]  [1240k]  [1440k]  [1840k]    How to download a Videocast
Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WE 552
NLM ID: 101658186
CIT Live ID: 15929
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18941