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Towards Cancer Biomarker Discovery Using Clinical MS-based Proteomics

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Air date: Thursday, April 3, 2014, 10:00:00 AM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 146, (11 Live, 135 On-demand)
Category: Proteomics
Runtime: 00:39:24
Description: Proteomics Interest Group

Cancer biology and clinical oncology are undergoing rapid transformation, specifically from an organ-centric to a molecular pathways focused disciplines. Data obtained from cancer cell lines and/or animal models are not always predictive of what is actually happening in human cancers in vivo. Hence, mass-spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics of clinical specimens plays important role in cancer biomarker research because of its capability to directly measure gene end-products within a tumor micro-environment. However, despite advances in cancer biomarker research, the translation of proteomic methods and findings to applicable clinical assays has been disappointing. Principal factors that hinder (MS)-based biomarker research include (i) significant heterogeneity of solid tumors, (ii) formidable variability of protein expression in the human population proper, (iii) huge dynamic range of human plasma protein expression (i.e., >10 orders of magnitude), (iv) the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass, (v) substantial amounts of highly abundant blood-derived proteins found in intestinal fluid and tissue-embedded networks of blood and lymph capillaries, (vi) considerable mismatches between the dynamic range of current MS instrumentation and the dynamic range of protein content in clinical specimens, and (vii) the majority of validated proteomics-derived “potential” cancer biomarkers were not germane to the tumor in question. In addition, the poor experimental design of early ‘proof-of-principle’ studies relying mostly on plasma/serum and low-resolution MS instrumentation have not been beneficial to the field of clinical proteomics. This presentation focuses on our progress in solving technological barriers interfering with MS-based profiling of clinical specimens. The present strategy/pipeline may accelerate translation of proteomic findings into novel cancer biomarker and/or MS-based clinical tests.

For more information go to http://proteome.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Towards cancer biomarker discovery using clinical mS-based proteomics / Josip Blonder ; Proteomics Interest Group.
Author: Blonder, Josip.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Proteomics Interest Group,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Biology and clinical oncology are undergoing rapid transformation, specifically from an organ-centric to a molecular pathways focused disciplines. Data obtained from cancer cell lines and/or animal models are not always predictive of what is actually happening in human cancers in vivo. Hence, mass-spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics of clinical specimens plays important role in cancer biomarker research because of its capability to directly measure gene end-products within a tumor micro-environment. However, despite advances in cancer biomarker research, the translation of proteomic methods and findings to applicable clinical assays has been disappointing. Principal factors that hinder (MS)-based biomarker research include (i) significant heterogeneity of solid tumors, (ii) formidable variability of protein expression in the human population proper, (iii) huge dynamic range of human plasma protein expression (i.e., >10 orders of magnitude), (iv) the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass, (v) substantial amounts of highly abundant blood-derived proteins found in intestinal fluid and tissue-embedded networks of blood and lymph capillaries, (vi) considerable mismatches between the dynamic range of current MS instrumentation and the dynamic range of protein content in clinical specimens, and (vii) the majority of validated proteomics-derived "potential" cancer biomarkers were not germane to the tumor in question. In addition, the poor experimental design of early "proof-of-principle" studies relying mostly on plasma/serum and low-resolution MS instrumentation have not been beneficial to the field of clinical proteomics. This presentation focuses on our progress in solving technological barriers interfering with MS-based profiling of clinical specimens. The present strategy/pipeline may accelerate translation of proteomic findings into novel cancer biomarker and/or MS-based clinical tests.
Subjects: Biomarkers
Mass Spectrometry
Neoplasms--diagnosis
Neoplasms--genetics
Proteomics
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: QZ 241
NLM ID: 101631785
CIT Live ID: 13965
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18379