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Regional Specifications of Adult Neural Stem Cells

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Air date: Monday, June 27, 2011, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 309 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 01:13:12
Description: Neuroscience Seminar Series

The Alvarez-Buylla Lab is interested in the function and regulation of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. They address questions about the mechanisms of neuronal birth, migration, and differentiation, and how neural stem cells or their immediate progeny may be related to brain tumor initiation. The subventricular zone (SVZ), the most extensive germinal niche in the adult mammalian brain, contains large numbers of neural stem cells that can generate new neurons and glial cells throughout life. By means of chain migration, young neurons born in the SVZ reach the olfactory bulb in the mouse brain, where they become fully integrated into functional circuits. The Alvarez-Buylla Lab has identified that the neural stem cells in the SVZ are a subpopulation of astrocytes and that adult neural stem cells are heterogeneous with particular types of neurons derived from progenitors from specific locations of the mouse SVZ.

Recently, Dr. Alvarez-Buylla been investigating the properties and ontogeny of astrocytes that function as stem cells in the rodent and human brain, as well as the regulation of their proliferation and the mechanisms that control their migration in the adult brain. How do cells migrate and orient during journeys through the very complex terrain of the adult brain? Once young neurons reach their destination, they need to integrate into neural circuits that are already functional. How is this accomplished? How do these new neurons contribute to plasticity without disturbing circuits that are already active? These are just some of the questions that drive the research in the Alvarez-Buylla lab.

For more information, visit: http://neuroseries.info.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Regional specifications of adult neural stem cells [electronic resource] / Arturo Alvarez-Buylla.
Series: Neuroscience seminar series
Author: Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Neuroscience seminar series
Abstract: (CIT): Neuroscience Seminar Series The Alvarez-Buylla Lab is interested in the function and regulation of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. They address questions about the mechanisms of neuronal birth, migration, and differentiation, and how neural stem cells or their immediate progeny may be related to brain tumor initiation. The subventricular zone (SVZ), the most extensive germinal niche in the adult mammalian brain, contains large numbers of neural stem cells that can generate new neurons and glial cells throughout life. By means of chain migration, young neurons born in the SVZ reach the olfactory bulb in the mouse brain, where they become fully integrated into functional circuits. The Alvarez-Buylla Lab has identified that the neural stem cells in the SVZ are a subpopulation of astrocytes and that adult neural stem cells are heterogeneous with particular types of neurons derived from progenitors from specific locations of the mouse SVZ. Recently, Dr. Alvarez-Buylla been investigating the properties and ontogeny of astrocytes that function as stem cells in the rodent and human brain, as well as the regulation of their proliferation and the mechanisms that control their migration in the adult brain. How do cells migrate and orient during journeys through the very complex terrain of the adult brain? Once young neurons reach their destination, they need to integrate into neural circuits that are already functional. How is this accomplished? How do these new neurons contribute to plasticity without disturbing circuits that are already active? These are just some of the questions that drive the research in the Alvarez-Buylla lab. For more information, visit: http://neuroseries.info.nih.gov.
Subjects: Adult Stem Cells
Brain--cytology
Neural Stem Cells
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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NLM Classification: WL 102.3
NLM ID: 101565236
CIT Live ID: 10351
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?16739

 

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