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Comprehensive Metabolic Profiling for Defining Obesity and Diabetes Mechanisms

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Air date: Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 157 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:07:38
Description: We seek to apply comprehensive metabolic analysis tools (sometimes called “metabolomics”) for understanding of mechanisms underlying chronic human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Current approaches include analysis of metabolic flux by 13C NMR-based mass isotopomer analysis (in collaboration with Drs. Shawn Burgess and A. Dean Sherry and associates, Dallas, TX) and metabolic profiling of important groups of metabolic intermediates by both “targeted” and “unbiased” mass spectrometry (in collaboration with Drs. James Bain, Robert Stevens, Olga Ilkayeva, Brett Wenner, Michael Muehlbauer, Mark Butler, and David Millington at Duke).

These tools have been used to investigate the mechanism of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mechanisms of its impairment in type 2 diabetes. The tools have also been used to define mechanisms underlying development of peripheral insulin resistance in animals and humans. For example, we have recently identified perturbations of branched chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism in multiple cohorts of insulin resistant humans compared to normally insulin sensitive controls and have translated these findings to rodent models to demonstrate a contribution of BCAA to development of insulin resistance that is independent of body weight. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. Alan Attie at the University of Wisconsin, we have integrated transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis to identify new pathways that control hepatic gluconeogenesis and PEPCK expression. These examples will serve to illustrate the potential of comprehensive metabolic profiling methods for providing insights into diabetes and obesity mechanisms.

The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
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NLM Title: Comprehensive metabolic profiling for defining obesity and diabetes mechanisms [electronic resource] / Christopher Newgard.
Series: NIH Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Author: Newgard, Christopher.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Abstract: (CIT): We seek to apply comprehensive metabolic analysis tools (sometimes called "metabolomics") for understanding of mechanisms underlying chronic human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Current approaches include analysis of metabolic flux by 13C NMR-based mass isotopomer analysis (in collaboration with Drs. Shawn Burgess and A. Dean Sherry and associates, Dallas, TX) and metabolic profiling of important groups of metabolic intermediates by both "targeted" and "unbiased" mass spectrometry (in collaboration with Drs. James Bain, Robert Stevens, Olga Ilkayeva, Brett Wenner, Michael Muehlbauer, Mark Butler, and David Millington at Duke). These tools have been used to investigate the mechanism of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mechanisms of its impairment in type 2 diabetes. The tools have also been used to define mechanisms underlying development of peripheral insulin resistance in animals and humans. For example, we have recently identified perturbations of branched chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism in multiple cohorts of insulin resistant humans compared to normally insulin sensitive controls and have translated these findings to rodent models to demonstrate a contribution of BCAA to development of insulin resistance that is independent of body weight. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. Alan Attie at the University of Wisconsin, we have integrated transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis to identify new pathways that control hepatic gluconeogenesis and PEPCK expression. These examples will serve to illustrate the potential of comprehensive metabolic profiling methods for providing insights into diabetes and obesity mechanisms. The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
Subjects: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2--metabolism
Metabolome--physiology
Obesity--metabolism
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WD 210
NLM ID: 101559797
CIT Live ID: 10049
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?16525

 

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