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Bacteria as master regulators and aphrodisiacs

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Air date: Wednesday, May 25, 2016, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 275, (80 Live, 195 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:54:52
Description: NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Choanoflagellates are the closest living relatives of animals, and the mechanisms underlying their interactions with bacteria promise to illuminate both the origin of animals and the interactions between animals and bacteria. By studying the choanoflagellate S. rosetta, Dr. King’s lab has discovered that specific lipids produced by environmental bacteria determine the development of multicellular "rosettes" from a founding cell. Recently, she has found that bacteria in the genus Vibrio regulate gametogenesis and mating in S. rosetta. Moreover, her lab has detected that bioactive molecules produced by bacteria act to induce, enhance, and inhibit developmental switches in choanoflagellates. Thus, bacterial control of morphogenesis in S. rosetta follows a regulatory logic resembling transcription-factor-based endogenous regulation of development in animals.

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NLM Title: Bacteria as master regulators and aphrodisiacs / Nicole King.
Author: King, Nicole.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Choanoflagellates are the closest living relatives of animals, and the mechanisms underlying their interactions with bacteria promise to illuminate both the origin of animals and the interactions between animals and bacteria. By studying the choanoflagellate S. rosetta, Dr. King's lab has discovered that specific lipids produced by environmental bacteria determine the development of multicellular "rosettes" from a founding cell. Recently, she has found that bacteria in the genus Vibrio regulate gametogenesis and mating in S. rosetta. Moreover, her lab has detected that bioactive molecules produced by bacteria act to induce, enhance, and inhibit developmental switches in choanoflagellates. Thus, bacterial control of morphogenesis in S. rosetta follows a regulatory logic resembling transcription-factor-based endogenous regulation of development in animals.
Subjects: Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Biological Evolution
Choanoflagellata--growth & development
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QW 52
NLM ID: 101684410
CIT Live ID: 18963
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=18963