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Synaptic mechanisms underlying multisensory processing in the cerebellum

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Air date: Monday, May 2, 2016, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 224 (19 Live, 205 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 01:04:36
Description: NIH Neuroscience Series Seminar

Within the brain there are billions of cells (neurons) that communicate with each other via specialized contacts called synapses, where a chemical (neurotransmitter) is passed between the two cells. Defects in the communication between synapses are thought to be at the heart of the memory deficits associated with neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, elucidating the properties of synapses and their ability to adapt the strength of such communication is fundamental to our understanding of brain function, learning, and memory storage under normal and pathological conditions. Such questions are generally addressed with electrophysiology, but his laboratory has taken the ambitious step to develop and apply optical tools to study the physiological signaling within neuronal subcompartments that are inaccessible to most other methods. The work in his laboratory has been focused on the development of optical techniques, which circumvent this temporal and spatial barrier, including: rapid two-photon and single photon calcium imaging and detection, optical detection of neuronal membrane voltage, and neurotransmitter uncaging. By monitoring and manipulating synaptic signaling in thin dendrites, single spines, dendritic branches and even in presynaptic boutons they will identify new cellular mechanisms fundamental for understanding information flow, and the computation power of neurons within the brain.
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NLM Title: Synaptic mechanisms underlying multisensory processing in the cerebellum / David DeGregorio.
Author: DeGregorio, David.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Within the brain there are billions of cells (neurons) that communicate with each other via specialized contacts called synapses, where a chemical (neurotransmitter) is passed between the two cells. Defects in the communication between synapses are thought to be at the heart of the memory deficits associated with neuropathological disorders such as Alzheimer"s disease. Therefore, elucidating the properties of synapses and their ability to adapt the strength of such communication is fundamental to our understanding of brain function, learning, and memory storage under normal and pathological conditions. Such questions are generally addressed with electrophysiology, but his laboratory has taken the ambitious step to develop and apply optical tools to study the physiological signaling within neuronal subcompartments that are inaccessible to most other methods. The work in his laboratory has been focused on the development of optical techniques, which circumvent this temporal and spatial barrier, including: rapid two-photon and single photon calcium imaging and detection, optical detection of neuronal membrane voltage, and neurotransmitter uncaging. By monitoring and manipulating synaptic signaling in thin dendrites, single spines, dendritic branches and even in presynaptic boutons they will identify new cellular mechanisms fundamental for understanding information flow, and the computation power of neurons within the brain.
Subjects: Cerebellum--physiology
Neuronal Plasticity
Sensation--physiology
Synaptic Transmission--physiology
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
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NLM Classification: WL 702
NLM ID: 101684388
CIT Live ID: 17986
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=17986