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Pulse Trains to Percepts: The Challenge of Creating a Perceptually Intelligible World with Sight Recovery Technologies

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Air date: Monday, January 4, 2016, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 00:56:57
Description: NIH Neuroscience Seminar Series

Dr. Fine’s goal is to understand the mechanisms of plasticity in the human brain by linking changes in function to changes in neuroanatomical structure. They currently study the effects of human visual deprivation using a conjunction of “state-of-the-art” imaging techniques including BOLD imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution structural imaging.

While the effects of visual deprivation have been well studied in animal models, much less is known about the effects of blindness on human early visual pathways. They think this is an interesting scientific question for two reasons. First, a deeper understanding of the effects of blindness will prove increasingly important as new sight restoration procedures (such as retinal prosthetic implants, epithelial stem cell replacements, gene therapies and retinal transplants) become available over the next few decades. Second, blindness due to peripheral causes is an excellent model system for understanding prenatal, postnatal and adult cortical plasticity.
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NLM Title: Pulse trains to percepts : the challenge of creating a perceptually intelligible world with sight recovery technologies / Ione Fine.
Author: Fine, Ione.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Dr. Fine's goal is to understand the mechanisms of plasticity in the human brain by linking changes in function to changes in neuroanatomical structure. They currently study the effects of human visual deprivation using a conjunction of "state-of-the-art" imaging techniques including BOLD imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution structural imaging. While the effects of visual deprivation have been well studied in animal models, much less is known about the effects of blindness on human early visual pathways. They think this is an interesting scientific question for two reasons. First, a deeper understanding of the effects of blindness will prove increasingly important as new sight restoration procedures (such as retinal prosthetic implants, epithelial stem cell replacements, gene therapies and retinal transplants) become available over the next few decades. Second, blindness due to peripheral causes is an excellent model system for understanding prenatal, postnatal and adult cortical plasticity.
Subjects: Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Neuronal Plasticity
Retinal Diseases--rehabilitation
Visual Pathways--physiopathology
Visual Prosthesis
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
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NLM Classification: WW 270
NLM ID: 101676574
CIT Live ID: 17435
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=17435