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Molecular Mechanisms of Gene X Environment Interaction in Stress-Related Psychiatric Disorders

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Air date: Monday, February 24, 2014, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 343 (51 Live, 292 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 00:49:53
Description: Neuroscience Seminar Series

Dr. Binder has received her medical training at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria and the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. She then completed a PhD in Neuroscience at Emory University, Atlanta, USA. She currently holds a joint appointment as as an Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University School of Medicine and a Research Group Leader (RG Molecular Genetics of Depression) at the Max-Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich. Dr. Binder has authored or co-authored more than 80 original articles and book chapters in the fields of neuropsychopharmacology, neuroendocrinology and psychiatric genetics. She has received a number of awards and honors, including the Theodore Reich award of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics and the Max Hamilton award of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum. Her main research interests are the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs as well as gene x environment interactions in mood and anxiety disorders, with a focus on genes regulating the stress hormone response. The major focus of their research group is to identify the genetic bases of mood and anxiety disorders. For this they use genome-wide association studies, gene expression studies and DNA methylation studies combined with candidate gene-based approaches. These molecular data are paired with environmental information as well as a number of endophenotypes for a better understanding of the etiopathogenesis of these disorders. This might allow to identify biologically more homogenous subgroups and improve treatment options for these disorders.
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NLM Title: Molecular mechanisms of gene X environment interaction in stress-related psychiatric disorders / Elisabeth Binder.
Author: Binder, Elisabeth.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Neuroscience Seminar Series Dr. Binder has received her medical training at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria and the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. She then completed a PhD in Neuroscience at Emory University, Atlanta, USA. She currently holds a joint appointment as as an Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University School of Medicine and a Research Group Leader (RG Molecular Genetics of Depression) at the Max-Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich. Dr. Binder has authored or co-authored more than 80 original articles and book chapters in the fields of neuropsychopharmacology, neuroendocrinology and psychiatric genetics. She has received a number of awards and honors, including the Theodore Reich award of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics and the Max Hamilton award of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum. Her main research interests are the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs as well as gene x environment interactions in mood and anxiety disorders, with a focus on genes regulating the stress hormone response. The major focus of their research group is to identify the genetic bases of mood and anxiety disorders. For this they use genome-wide association studies, gene expression studies and DNA methylation studies combined with candidate gene-based approaches. These molecular data are paired with environmental information as well as a number of endophenotypes for a better understanding of the etiopathogenesis of these disorders. This might allow to identify biologically more homogenous subgroups and improve treatment options for these disorders.
Subjects: Anxiety Disorders--genetics
Mood Disorders--genetics
Receptors, Glucocorticoid
Tacrolimus Binding Proteins
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WM 171
NLM ID: 101628116
CIT Live ID: 13688
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=13688