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Sickle Cell Disease: What can Africa Contribute?

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Air date: Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 318, (70 Live, 248 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:57:28
Description: Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

There has been interest in using sickle cell disease (SCD) as a model to understand the relationship of genes, environment, and disease. Worldwide, there are 300,000 babies born with SCD each year and more than 70 percent of them are on the African continent. Unfortunately, mortality in many African countries is still high even though cost-effective interventions would reduce childhood deaths in SCD. It is therefore critical that investment in research is accompanied by improvement in SCD health care. This lecture will discuss how existing resources in Africa and the United States can be leveraged to develop programs that integrate health care, education, and research. Strategic investment has the potential of providing unprecedented opportunities to make a significant impact in reducing the public health burden of SCD. SCD can serve as a model to demonstrates how effective partnerships in Africa at a local, regional, and global level can lead to the translation of genome-based knowledge that extends beyond genomics, SCD, and Africa.
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NLM Title: Sickle cell disease : what can Africa contribute? / Julie Makani.
Author: Makani, Julie.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): There has been interest in using sickle cell disease (SCD) as a model to understand the relationship of genes, environment, and disease. Worldwide, there are 300,000 babies born with SCD each year and more than 70 percent of them are on the African continent. Unfortunately, mortality in many African countries is still high even though cost-effective interventions would reduce childhood deaths in SCD. It is therefore critical that investment in research is accompanied by improvement in SCD health care. This lecture will discuss how existing resources in Africa and the United States can be leveraged to develop programs that integrate health care, education, and research. Strategic investment has the potential of providing unprecedented opportunities to make a significant impact in reducing the public health burden of SCD. SCD can serve as a model to demonstrates how effective partnerships in Africa at a local, regional, and global level can lead to the translation of genome-based knowledge that extends beyond genomics, SCD, and Africa.
Subjects: Africa South of the Sahara
Anemia, Sickle Cell
International Cooperation
United States
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WH 170
NLM ID: 101604603
CIT Live ID: 12301
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=12301