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HIV Dynamics and Replication Program Conference on Innate Immunity: Sensing, Signaling, and Selection

   
Air date: Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Description: The HIV Dynamics and Replication Program is hosting this half-day conference to showcase the latest findings in the broad field of innate immunity. The presentations will highlight recent advances in understanding cell-intrinsic immune strategies by which hosts counteract viral and bacterial infections and the mechanisms by which pathogens circumvent or overcome these immune barriers. Specific areas of focus will include immune sensing, mutational escape, paleovirology, interferon-induced effector specificity, inflammasomes, and evolutionary conflicts between pathogens and host restriction factors. An in-depth discussion of recent progress in our understanding host-pathogen interactions within infected cells should lead to new insights into the roles that cellular factors play in preventing infections in uninfected cells, which will aid in the international public health efforts.

For more information go to https://ncifrederick.cancer.gov/Events/hivdrug2017/
Author: Paul Bieniasz, Ph.D. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University); Alex Compton, Ph.D. (HIV Dynamics and Replication Program, National Cancer Institute); Carolyn Coyne, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine); David Knipe, Ph.D. (Harvard Medical School); Harmit Malik, Ph.D. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center); Nan Yan, Ph.D. (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)
Runtime: 4 hours, 45 minutes