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NMDA receptor trafficking and synaptic dysfunction in Huntington disease

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Air date: Monday, April 27, 2015, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 265, (26 Live, 239 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 00:54:42
Description: Neuroscience Seminar Series

Dr. Raymond is a professor and movement disorders neurologist in the Brain Research Centre, Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine. She has been actively researching molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in cell culture and animal models for the past 15 years, with a focus on Huntington disease. Her laboratory uses multiple techniques and approaches, with particular emphasis on electrophysiology to assess changes in neuronal transmission and function, especially those that occur in basal ganglia disorders. Most of these studies describe physiological assessments of glutamate receptor function and modulation, as well as glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal or hippocampal neurons. In addition, she has contributed to studies involving observational and clinical trials in human Huntington disease.
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NLM Title: NMDA receptor trafficking and synaptic dysfunction in Huntington disease / Lynn A. Raymond.
Author: Raymond, Lynn A.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Neuroscience Seminar Series Dr. Raymond is a professor and movement disorders neurologist in the Brain Research Centre, Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine. She has been actively researching molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in cell culture and animal models for the past 15 years, with a focus on Huntington disease. Her laboratory uses multiple techniques and approaches, with particular emphasis on electrophysiology to assess changes in neuronal transmission and function, especially those that occur in basal ganglia disorders. Most of these studies describe physiological assessments of glutamate receptor function and modulation, as well as glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal or hippocampal neurons. In addition, she has contributed to studies involving observational and clinical trials in human Huntington disease.
Subjects: Huntington Disease--physiopathology
Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: WL 359.5
NLM ID: 101658201
CIT Live ID: 15882
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18967