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How Does It Feel? Closing the Gap Between Unconscious and Conscious Emotion

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Air date: Monday, February 5, 2007, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 92 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 01:05:56
Description: Dr. LeDoux lab is aimed at understanding the biological mechanisms of emotional memory. They are particularly interested in how the brain learns and stores information about danger. Using classical fear conditioning as way of inducing emotional memories in rats, they have mapped the neural pathways by which sensory stimuli enter and flow through the brain in the process of fear learning. This work implicated specific circuits in within the amygdala as essential for the formation of memories of the fear conditioning experience. It is now clear that the same brain system underlies fear learning in and humans. The detailed mechanisms of fear, which can only be uncovered through animal studies, are thus applicable to understanding fear processing in the human brain.

NIH Neuroscience Seminar Series
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NLM Title: How does it feel? : Closing the gap between unconscious and conscious emotion [electronic resource] / Joseph Ledoux.
Series: Closing the gap between unconscious and conscious emotion
Author: LeDoux, Joseph E.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Closing the gap between unconscious and conscious emotion
Abstract: (CIT): Dr. LeDoux's lab is aimed at understanding the biological mechanisms of emotional memory. They are particularly interested in how the brain learns and stores information about danger. Using classical fear conditioning as a way of inducing emotional memories in rats, they have mapped the neural pathways by which sensory stimuli enter and flow through the brain in the process of fear learning. This work implicated specific circuits within the amygdala as essential for the formation of memories of the fear conditioning experience. It is now clear that the same brain system underlies fear learning in humans. The detailed mechanisms of fear, which can only be uncovered through animal studies, are thus applicable to understanding fear processing in the human brain. NIH Neuroscience Seminar Series.
Subjects: Consciousness
Emotions--physiology
Memory--physiology
Unconscious (Psychology)
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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NLM Classification: WL 102
NLM ID: 101300933
CIT Live ID: 5233
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?13616

 

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