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New Insights into Flavivirus Pathogenesis and Immunity: Yes, that Includes Zika Virus

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Air date: Wednesday, May 25, 2016, 4:15:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 406, (86 Live, 320 On-demand)
Category: Immunology
Runtime: 01:10:56
Description: Immunology Interest Group

Dr. Michael Diamond received a B.A. degree in political science at Columbia University before pursuing medical and graduate training at Harvard School of Medicine. As a graduate student, he investigated the regulation of the integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) in the laboratory of Dr. Timothy Springer. He did a residency and a clinical fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of California, San Francisco, and most of his post-doctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Eva Harris at the University of California, Berkeley. He was recruited to Washington University in St. Louis as an Assistant Professor in 2001 and is now a full Professor with tenure. He is the co-director of the Midwest Regional Center for Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research and Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccine Development, Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs. Dr. Diamond leads an extremely productive and interdisciplinary research program focused on the pathogenesis of and immunity to viral infections. These efforts may be divided generally into i.) studies of the mechanisms of antiviral humoral immunity (West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Chikungunya virus and most recently Zika virus) and ii.) innate responses to viral infection. With respect to the former, his group has made significant contributions to understanding the humoral immunity using animal models of flavi- and alphavirus infections (e.g. Purtha, JEM, 2011) and mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization (e.g.: Oliphant et al., Nature Medicine, 2005). The second aspect of the Dr. Diamond’s program has defined pathways for the innate recognition of these viruses and their relative contribution toward immunity (e.g. Daffis, Nature 2010). This includes most recently systems biology approaches to dissecting innate immunity in the brain, and the use of mouse model to study Zika virus pathogenesis (e.g. Lazear et al., Cell Host Microbe 2016).
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NLM Title: New insights into flavivirus pathogenesis and immunity : yes, that includes zika virus / Michael S. Diamond ; Immunology Interest Group.
Author: Diamond, Michael S.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Immunology Interest Group,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Dr. Michael Diamond received a B.A. degree in political science at Columbia University before pursuing medical and graduate training at Harvard School of Medicine. As a graduate student, he investigated the regulation of the integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) in the laboratory of Dr. Timothy Springer. He did a residency and a clinical fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of California, San Francisco, and most of his post-doctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Eva Harris at the University of California, Berkeley. He was recruited to Washington University in St. Louis as an Assistant Professor in 2001 and is now a full Professor with tenure. He is the co-director of the Midwest Regional Center for Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research and Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccine Development, Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs. Dr. Diamond leads an extremely productive and interdisciplinary research program focused on the pathogenesis of and immunity to viral infections. These efforts may be divided generally into studies of the mechanisms of antiviral humoral immunity (West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Chikungunya virus and most recently Zika virus) and innate responses to viral infection. With respect to the former, his group has made significant contributions to understanding the humoral immunity using animal models of flavi- and alphavirus infections (e.g. Purtha, JEM, 2011) and mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization (e.g.: Oliphant et al., Nature Medicine, 2005). The second aspect of the Dr. Diamond"s program has defined pathways for the innate recognition of these viruses and their relative contribution toward immunity (e.g. Daffis, Nature 2010). This includes most recently systems biology approaches to dissecting innate immunity in the brain, and the use of mouse model to study Zika virus pathogenesis (e.g. Lazear et al., Cell Host Microbe 2016).
Subjects: Flavivirus Infections--etiology
Flavivirus Infections--immunology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: WC 501
NLM ID: 101684411
CIT Live ID: 19225
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19708