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Form Meets Function: Structurally Diverse Cilia and Their Roles in Sensory Signaling

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Air date: Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 223, (64 Live, 159 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:59:42
Description:

NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture

Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that arenow known to be present on nearly all differentiated cell types in metazoans.Cilia house signaling molecules that transduce environmental cues and regulatecellular homeostasis and organismal development. Disruption of cilia structureor function is linked with a plethora of diseases termed ciliopathies, many ofwhich are characterized by sensory defects. Despite increased focus on thiscritically important cellular structure, the mechanisms that link ciliogenesisand cilia structure to cilia-based signaling remain to be fully elucidated. Thenematode C. elegans provides an excellent model for the study of ciliogenesisand sensory signaling. Cilia are present only on sensory neurons in C. elegans,and as in other organisms, are essential for the unique functions of theseneuron types. In particular, many sensory neurons in C. elegans exhibitremarkably complex cilia structures, providing an excellent system in which toexplore the conserved pathways that couple the generation of specialized ciliamorphology to unique cellular and signaling functions. In her presentation, Dr.Sengupta will describe recent and ongoing work in the lab on mechanisms thatgenerate and maintain cilia structural diversity in C. elegans, and discuss thecomplex interplay between cilia architecture and sensory neuron function.


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NLM Title: Form meets function : structurally diverse cilia and their roles in sensory signaling / Piali Sengupta.
Author: Sengupta, Piali.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that are now known to be present on nearly all differentiated cell types in metazoans. Cilia house signaling molecules that transduce environmental cues and regulatecellular homeostasis and organismal development. Disruption of cilia structureor function is linked with a plethora of diseases termed ciliopathies, many of which are characterized by sensory defects. Despite increased focus on this critically important cellular structure, the mechanisms that link ciliogenesisand cilia structure to cilia-based signaling remain to be fully elucidated. Thenematode C. elegans provides an excellent model for the study of ciliogenesis and sensory signaling. Cilia are present only on sensory neurons in C. elegans, and as in other organisms, are essential for the unique functions of these neuron types. In particular, many sensory neurons in C. elegans exhibit remarkably complex cilia structures, providing an excellent system in which to explore the conserved pathways that couple the generation of specialized ciliamorphology to unique cellular and signaling functions. In her presentation, Dr. Sengupta will describe recent and ongoing work in the lab on mechanisms that generate and maintain cilia structural diversity in C. elegans, and discuss the complex interplay between cilia architecture and sensory neuron function.
Subjects: Caenorhabditis elegans
Cilia--physiology
Cilia--ultrastructure
Signal Transduction
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: QP 310.C5
NLM ID: 101671895
CIT Live ID: 17260
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19256