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Neutrophils in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases: casting the NET widely

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Air date: Friday, May 8, 2015, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 330, (66 Live, 264 On-demand)
Category: NIH Director's Seminars
Runtime: 00:59:14
Description: NIH Director's Seminar Series

Systemic autoimmune diseases comprise a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a failure in self-tolerance to a wide variety of intracellular autoantigens, and include conditions like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated-vasculitis.

Work at the Systemic Autoimmunity Branch has focused on characterizing the role that aberrant neutrophils play in the promotion of loss of immunological tolerance, amplification of inflammatory responses and direct end-organ damage in these diseases. One characteristic of neutrophils is their capacity to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon exposure to danger signals. Dr. Kaplan's group identified a distinct subset of proinflammatory neutrophils in patients with specific systemic autoimmune diseases (lupus, vasculitis) that display exuberant capacity to form NETs in the absence of infection. She has proposed that NETs may play important roles in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases through externalization and modification of intracellular antigens, induction of distinct proinflammatory pathways and deleterious effects on the vasculature and other tissues. Her group has proposed a pathogenic crosstalk between neutrophils and type I IFNs that leads to crucial pro inflammatory pathways in lupus and its associated vascular damage.

Dr. Kaplan and her group have identified putative pathways of NET inhibition in autoimmune diseases that abrogate clinical phenotype, immune dysregulation and vasculopathy in lupus and atherosclerosis animal models. Ongoing studies are focusing on identifying mechanisms and pathways leading to autoimmune NET formation, their pathogenic implications in human disease and in the identification of novel therapeutic targets.
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NLM Title: Neutrophils in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases : casting the NET widely / Mariana J. Kaplan.
Author: Kaplan, Mariana.
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Director's Seminar Series Systemic autoimmune diseases comprise a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a failure in self-tolerance to a wide variety of intracellular autoantigens, and include conditions like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated-vasculitis. Work at the Systemic Autoimmunity Branch has focused on characterizing the role that aberrant neutrophils play in the promotion of loss of immunological tolerance, amplification of inflammatory responses and direct end-organ damage in these diseases. One characteristic of neutrophils is their capacity to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon exposure to danger signals. Dr. Kaplan's group identified a distinct subset of proinflammatory neutrophils in patients with specific systemic autoimmune diseases (lupus, vasculitis) that display exuberant capacity to form NETs in the absence of infection. She has proposed that NETs may play important roles in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases through externalization and modification of intracellular antigens, induction of distinct proinflammatory pathways and deleterious effects on the vasculature and other tissues. Her group has proposed a pathogenic crosstalk between neutrophils and type I IFNs that leads to crucial pro inflammatory pathways in lupus and its associated vascular damage. Dr. Kaplan and her group have identified putative pathways of NET inhibition in autoimmune diseases that abrogate clinical phenotype, immune dysregulation and vasculopathy in lupus and atherosclerosis animal models. Ongoing studies are focusing on identifying mechanisms and pathways leading to autoimmune NET formation, their pathogenic implications in human disease and in the identification of novel therapeutic targets.
Subjects: Autoimmune Diseases--physiopathology
Neutrophils--immunology
Publication Types: Lecture
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NLM Classification: WD 305
NLM ID: 101660629
CIT Live ID: 16241
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18990