Skip Navigation


CIT can broadcast your seminar, conference or meeting live to a world-wide audience over the Internet as a real-time streaming video. The event can be recorded and made available for viewers to watch at their convenience as an on-demand video or a downloadable podcast. CIT can also broadcast NIH-only or HHS-only content.

Neural signals for exploration and navigation in the medial temporal lobe

Loading video...

231 Views  
   
Air date: Monday, March 16, 2015, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 231, (36 Live, 195 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 00:59:28
Description: Neuroscience Seminar Series

The focus of Dr. Buffalo lab’s research is to contribute to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms involved in learning and memory. Using neurophysiological techniques, they record simultaneously from multiple electrodes in the hippocampus and surrounding cortex in awake, behaving monkeys. They investigate how changes in neuronal activity correlate with the monkey's ability to learn and remember. They are particularly interested in the activity of neuronal networks that underlie learning and memory processes. They use spectral analysis techniques to investigate the role of oscillatory activity and neuronal synchronization in cognition.

Previous studies have identified a system of structures in the medial temporal lobe that is critical for declarative memory, the ability for the conscious recollection of facts and events. This system of structures includes the hippocampus and the surrounding cortical regions. These are the structures that are affected first in Alzheimer's disease, and lesions of these structures produce profound memory deficits. Their research focuses on potential mechanisms by which these structures set up new memories and how these structures might work together during memory formation and retrieval. Along with modulations in spiking activity of individual neurons, they investigate the role of synchronous oscillatory activity across networks of neurons.
Debug: Show Debug
NLM Title: Neural signals for exploration and navigation in the medial temporal lobe / Elizabeth Buffalo.
Author: Buffalo, Elizabeth.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): The focus of Dr. Buffalo lab's research is to contribute to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms involved in learning and memory. Using neurophysiological techniques, they record simultaneously from multiple electrodes in the hippocampus and surrounding cortex in awake, behaving monkeys. They investigate how changes in neuronal activity correlate with the monkey's ability to learn and remember. They are particularly interested in the activity of neuronal networks that underlie learning and memory processes. They use spectral analysis techniques to investigate the role of oscillatory activity and neuronal synchronization in cognition. Previous studies have identified a system of structures in the medial temporal lobe that is critical for declarative memory, the ability for the conscious recollection of facts and events. This system of structures includes the hippocampus and the surrounding cortical regions. These are the structures that are affected first in Alzheimer's disease, and lesions of these structures produce profound memory deficits. Their research focuses on potential mechanisms by which these structures set up new memories and how these structures might work together during memory formation and retrieval. Along with modulations in spiking activity of individual neurons, they investigate the role of synchronous oscillatory activity across networks of neurons.
Subjects: Memory--physiology
Neurons--physiology
Synaptic Transmission--physiology
Temporal Lobe--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[64k]  [150k]  [240k]  [440k]  [740k]  [1040k]  [1240k]  [1440k]  [1840k]    How to download a Videocast
Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WL 102.8
NLM ID: 101655820
CIT Live ID: 15003
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18894