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Culture, Research, and Health Outcomes Panel

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Air date: Friday, May 23, 2014, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 275, (39 Live, 236 On-demand)
Category: BSSR - Behavioral and Social Sciences
Runtime: 01:59:56
Description: NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Seminar Series

PRESENTERS:
-Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, R.N., Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles.
-Peter Guarnaccia, Ph.D., Rutgers.
-Laura Szalacha, Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Much of NIH’s portfolio of sociobehavioral and clinical research projects use proxy variables for culture, including,
• Demographic categories
• Geographic/political boundaries
• Language use at home
• National origin
• Race/ethnicity

These variables are often obtained only at intake and thus remain static. Consequently, they may obscure, rather than explain, specific processes in which cultural beliefs and practices influence practices related to health and wellbeing. To resolve this issue, OBSSR funded a supplemental panel to create an online, best-practices publication to operationalize culture in health research. They found much literature view culture as a deficit for racial/ethnic minorities when they conflate culture, race, & ethnicity; & depict cultural groups as homogeneous. This reinforces culture as static trait(s) rather than a dynamic construct. The recommendations provide six checkpoints to facilitate more thorough accounting for cultural processes in research:


1. Is the rationale for the inclusion of culture clearly articulated in the problem statement?
2. Is there a clearly articulated definition of culture for this study?
3. Are there known, salient theoretical cultural domains?
a. Known theoretical domains, unknown cultural domains?
b. Known cultural domains, unknown theoretical domains?
4. Do you articulate a conceptual framework that specifies how salient domains affect specific health/wellbeing issue(s)?
5. Is there correspondence between theoretical & cultural domains?
6. Do cross-culturally equivalent measures exist?

The principal investigator for this project, Dr. Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, and two members of the expert panel, Drs. Peter Guarnaccia and Laura Szalacha, will discuss background, measurement, and examples from this project that will be released as an online OBSSR publication, Transforming the Use of Culture in Health Research.
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NLM Title: Culture, research, and health outcomes panel / Marjorie Kagawa Singer, Laura Szalacha, Peter Guarnaccia.
Series: NIH behavioral and social sciences
Author: Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie.
Szalacha, Laura A.
Guarnaccia, Peter Joseph.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH behavioral and social sciences
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Seminar Series PRESENTERS: -Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, R.N., Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles. -Peter Guarnaccia, Ph.D., Rutgers. -Laura Szalacha, Ph.D., The Ohio State University. Much of NIH"s portfolio of sociobehavioral and clinical research projects use proxy variables for culture, including, demographic categories, geographic/political boundaries , language use at home , national origin, race/ethnicity. These variables are often obtained only at intake and thus remain static. Consequently, they may obscure, rather than explain, specific processes in which cultural beliefs and practices influence practices related to health and wellbeing. To resolve this issue, OBSSR funded a supplemental panel to create an online, best-practices publication to operationalize culture in health research. They found much literature view culture as a deficit for racial/ethnic minorities when they conflate culture, race, & ethnicity; & depict cultural groups as homogeneous. This reinforces culture as static trait(s) rather than a dynamic construct. The recommendations provide six checkpoints to facilitate more thorough accounting for cultural processes in research: 1. Is the rationale for the inclusion of culture clearly articulated in the problem statement? 2. Is there a clearly articulated definition of culture for this study? 3. Are there known, salient theoretical cultural domains? including a. Known theoretical domains, unknown cultural domains? b. Known cultural domains, unknown theoretical domains? 4. Do you articulate a conceptual framework that specifies how salient domains affect specific health/wellbeing issue(s)? 5. Is there correspondence between theoretical & cultural domains? 6. Do cross-culturally equivalent measures exist? The principal investigator for this project, Dr. Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, and two members of the expert panel, Drs. Peter Guarnaccia and Laura Szalacha, will discuss background, measurement, and examples from this project that will be released as an online OBSSR publication, Transforming the Use of Culture in Health Research.
Subjects: Culture
Health Behavior
Research Design
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: W 20.5
NLM ID: 101634145
CIT Live ID: 14227
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18454