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The Structural Basis of Ebola Viral Pathogenesis

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Air date: Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 1089, (110 Live, 979 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:55:40
Description: The Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series presents the NIH Director's Lecture

Dr. Saphire's lab studies viruses with compact genomes that encode just four to seven genes each. Viruses with limited genomes offer a defined landscape of possible protein-protein interactions. Each protein is critical-many are obligated to perform multiple functions and some rearrange their structures to achieve those new functions. As a result, these few polypeptides accomplish a surprisingly complex set of biological functions including immune evasion, receptor recognition, cell entry, transcription, translation, assembly and exit. Dr. Saphire systematically analyzes the structures and functions of each protein encodes by the virus to gain fundamental insights into the biology of entry, immune evasion, and assembly, and to decipher the collaborative roles of these proteins in pathogenesis. In this lecture, Dr. Saphire will illustrate the molecular function throughout the viral life cycle: how the Ebola virus glycoprotein remodels itself during viral entry and how this remodeling affects the antibody response; how the Ebola and Lassa viruses suppress host innate immune signaling; and how the Ebola matrix protein assembles into one structure to bud new virions and into a different conformation to bind RNA and control transcription inside infected cells.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov/
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NLM Title: The structural basis of Ebola viral pathogenesis / Erica Ollmann Saphire.
Author: Saphire, Erica Ollmann.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): The Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series presents the NIH Director's Lecture Dr. Saphire's lab studies viruses with compact genomes that encode just four to seven genes each. Viruses with limited genomes offer a defined landscape of possible protein-protein interactions. Each protein is critical-many are obligated to perform multiple functions and some rearrange their structures to achieve those new functions. As a result, these few polypeptides accomplish a surprisingly complex set of biological functions including immune evasion, receptor recognition, cell entry, transcription, translation, assembly and exit. Dr. Saphire systematically analyzes the structures and functions of each protein encodes by the virus to gain fundamental insights into the biology of entry, immune evasion, and assembly, and to decipher the collaborative roles of these proteins in pathogenesis. In this lecture, Dr. Saphire will illustrate the molecular function throughout the viral life cycle: how the Ebola virus glycoprotein remodels itself during viral entry and how this remodeling affects the antibody response; how the Ebola and Lassa viruses suppress host innate immune signaling; and how the Ebola matrix protein assembles into one structure to bud new virions and into a different conformation to bind RNA and control transcription inside infected cells.
Subjects: Ebolavirus--genetics
Ebolavirus--pathogenicity
Glycoproteins--genetics
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QW 168
NLM ID: 101622747
CIT Live ID: 13306
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18151