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Neural Basis of Strategic Choice

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Air date: Monday, December 12, 2011, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 430, (38 Live, 392 On-demand)
Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 01:03:57
Description: Neuroscience Seminar Series

Dr. Coricelli obtained his PhD in Economics from the University of Arizona. He worked for several years at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives of the CNRS in Lyon, France. He is currently an assistant professor of Economics and Psychology at the University of Southern California. He conduct his research using a fundamentally multidisciplinary approach (Neuroeconomics), drawing from behavioral and experimental economics, game theory, neuroimaging, neuropsychology, and cognitive neurosciences. His objective is to apply robust methods and findings from behavioral decision theory to study the brain structures that contribute to forming judgments and decisions, both in an individual and a social context. Examples of his research are: (1) the role of counterfactual emotions, such as regret and envy, in decision making (fMRI and Orbitofrontal patients studies); (2) the neural basis of bounded rational behavior: limit in depth of strategic reasoning; (3) the neural correlates of individual and social uncertainty: disposition effect, aspiration level, strategic uncertainty; (4) how the brain encodes learning signals: regret/fictive learning, reputation building; (5) impaired decision making in schizophrenia and autism.

Dr. Coricelli's point of view as an economist bring a relevant perspective about how individual performance affect behaviors that are central to social interaction. In particular his work shows how formalism from economics can be applied to studying how emotions and social interactions affect decision making. His work shows that aspects of the formalisms from economics can be combined with learning theory and behavioral analysis to provide more leverage in studying complex individual behavior.

For more information, visit: http://neuroseries.info.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Neural basis of strategic choice / Giorgio Coricelli.
Author: National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Neuroscience Seminar Series Dr. Coricelli obtained his PhD in Economics from the University of Arizona. He worked for several years at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives of the CNRS in Lyon, France. He is currently an assistant professor of Economics and Psychology at the University of Southern California. He conduct his research using a fundamentally multidisciplinary approach (Neuroeconomics), drawing from behavioral and experimental economics, game theory, neuroimaging, neuropsychology, and cognitive neurosciences. His objective is to apply robust methods and findings from behavioral decision theory to study the brain structures that contribute to forming judgments and decisions, both in an individual and a social context. Examples of his research are: (1) the role of counterfactual emotions, such as regret and envy, in decision making (fMRI and Orbitofrontal patients studies); (2) the neural basis of bounded rational behavior: limit in depth of strategic reasoning; (3) the neural correlates of individual and social uncertainty: disposition effect, aspiration level, strategic uncertainty; (4) how the brain encodes learning signals: regret/fictive learning, reputation building; (5) impaired decision making in schizophrenia and autism. Dr. Coricelli's point of view as an economist bring a relevant perspective about how individual performance affect behaviors that are central to social interaction. In particular his work shows how formalism from economics can be applied to studying how emotions and social interactions affect decision making. His work shows that aspects of the formalisms from economics can be combined with learning theory and behavioral analysis to provide more leverage in studying complex individual behavior.
Subjects: Choice Behavior--physiology
Game Theory
Psychophysiology
Risk Assessment
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: BF 611
NLM ID: 101576011
CIT Live ID: 10755
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?17030