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Age-by-Disease interactions in the Human Brain: Evidence & Model

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Air date: Thursday, September 4, 2014, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 237, (66 Live, 171 On-demand)
Category: Geroscience
Runtime: 01:03:33
Description: GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) Summer Seminar

The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) cordially invites you to its summer seminar, featuring Dr. Etienne Sibille. Dr. Sibille is the Campbell Family chair in Clinical Neuroscince, in the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute , Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Dr. Sibille’s research goals have consistently focused on translational research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular bases of depression, and specifically of the mood and affect dysregulation components of the illness. Studies in his laboratory encompass parallel investigations in postmortem brains of depressed and control subjects, and in genetic and environmental rodent models, with the aims of characterizing the primary pathology of depression and assessing causal links between identified molecular changes or candidate neurotransmitter systems and mood regulation. Current projects include translating human postmortem findings on the role of the GABA microcircuitry in mood regulation, and specifically of reduced somatostatin-positive dendritic targeting interneuron function. In addition, they have demonstrated that biological pathways affected during aging of the human brain largely overlap with neuropsychiatric and other neurological disease pathways and may in fact promote diseases, together providing a compelling rationale for investigating aging and diseases simultaneously. These latter hypotheses are now being tested in parallel in the human postmortem brain and in large epidemiological studies of subjects at the “vigor-to-frailty transition.”

The GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) was formed to enhance opportunities for discussion of the intersection between the biology of aging and the biology of disease and conditions that are of interest across ICs. It is focused on basic biology, but with a longer view towards translation. If you are interested in learning more, please visit the GSIG web site (http://sigs.nih.gov/geroscience/Pages/default.aspx).
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NLM Title: Age-by-disease interactions in the human brain : evidence & model / Dr. Etienne Sibille.
Author: Sibille, Etienne.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Geroscience Interest Group,
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Dr. Sibille's research goals have consistently focused on translational research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular bases of depression, and specifically of the mood and affect dysregulation components of the illness. Studies in his laboratory encompass parallel investigations in postmortem brains of depressed and control subjects, and in genetic and environmental rodent models, with the aims of characterizing the primary pathology of depression and assessing causal links between identified molecular changes or candidate neurotransmitter systems and mood regulation. Current projects include translating human postmortem findings on the role of the GABA microcircuitry in mood regulation, and specifically of reduced somatostatin-positive dendritic targeting interneuron function. In addition, they have demonstrated that biological pathways affected during aging of the human brain largely overlap with neuropsychiatric and other neurological disease pathways and may in fact promote diseases, together providing a compelling rationale for investigating aging and diseases simultaneously. These latter hypotheses are now being tested in parallel in the human postmortem brain and in large epidemiological studies of subjects at the "vigor-to-frailty transition".
Subjects: Aging--genetics
Brain Mapping
Depressive Disorder, Major--genetics
Models, Genetic
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WM 207
NLM ID: 101642818
CIT Live ID: 14587
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18586