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Opioid receptors and brain function

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Air date: Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 446, (204 Live, 242 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:01:27
Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Opiates have been in use for thousands of years for their remarkable pain-relieving and rewarding properties. Opiates produce their potent effects by activating opioid receptors in the brain, hijacking an endogenous opioid system, which is central to hedonic and mood homeostasis. Recently, revolutions in G-protein-coupled-receptor research, fascinating developments in basic neuroscience, and the rising opioid crisis have propelled opioid receptors back on stage. Dr. Kieffer's presentation will discuss rapidly evolving areas in opioid-receptor research for addiction including the key questions of whether we can use opiates to eliminate pain without addiction and how opioid receptors operate within the neurocircuitry of addiction. Dr. Kieffer will also present recent work describing how functional MRI is being used in mice to explore the link between the mu-opioid receptor gene and drug activities to whole-brain functional networks.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals/2018-2019
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NLM Title: Opioid receptors and brain function / Brigitte Kieffer.
Author: Kieffer, Brigitte L.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Opiates have been in use for thousands of years for their remarkable pain-relieving and rewarding properties. Opiates produce their potent effects by activating opioid receptors in the brain, hijacking an endogenous opioid system, which is central to hedonic and mood homeostasis. Recently, revolutions in G-protein-coupled-receptor research, fascinating developments in basic neuroscience, and the rising opioid crisis have propelled opioid receptors back on stage. Dr. Kieffer's presentation will discuss rapidly evolving areas in opioid-receptor research for addiction including the key questions of whether we can use opiates to eliminate pain without addiction and how opioid receptors operate within the neurocircuitry of addiction. Dr. Kieffer will also present recent work describing how functional MRI is being used in mice to explore the link between the mu-opioid receptor gene and drug activities to whole-brain functional networks.
Subjects: Brain--drug effects
Brain--physiology
Opioid-Related Disorders--physiopathology
Receptors, Opioid--drug effects
Receptors, Opioid--physiology
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QV 36
NLM ID: 101749146
CIT Live ID: 31987
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?27578