Skip Navigation

NIH VideoCasting

CIT can broadcast your seminar, conference or meeting live to a world-wide audience over the Internet as a real-time streaming video. The event can be recorded and made available for viewers to watch at their convenience as an on-demand video or a downloadable file. CIT can also broadcast NIH-only or HHS-only content.

Aquaporin water channels - from transfusion medicine to malaria

Loading video...

382 Views  
   
Air date: Wednesday, September 9, 2015, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 382, (128 Live, 254 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:57:37
Description: NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Biochemical analysis of the Rhesus blood group antigen led to the serendipitous discovery of AQP1, the first molecular water channel. Found throughout nature, aquaporin water channels confer high water permeability to cell membranes. AQP1 has been characterized biophysically, and the atomic structure of AQP1 is known. Identification of the Colton blood group antigen on the extracellular domain of AQP1 allowed identification of rare individuals who are AQP1-null and manifest a subclinical form of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Thirteen homologous proteins exist in humans. Some transport only water (aquaporins); others transport water plus glycerol (aquaglyceroporins). These proteins are required for generation of physiological fluids (urine, cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous humor, sweat, saliva, and tears). Involvement of aquaporins in multiple clinical states is becoming recognized—renal concentration, fluid retention, blindness, skin hydration, brain edema, thermal stress, glucose homeostasis, malaria, and even arsenic poisoning. Aquaporins are particularly important in plant biology. This information now provides the challenge of developing new technologies to manipulate aquaporins for clinical or agricultural benefits.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals
Debug: Show Debug
NLM Title: Aquaporin water channels : from transfusion medicine to malaria / Peter Agre.
Author: Agre, Peter.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Biochemical analysis of the Rhesus blood group antigen led to the serendipitous discovery of AQP1, the first molecular water channel. Found throughout nature, aquaporin water channels confer high water permeability to cell membranes. AQP1 has been characterized biophysically, and the atomic structure of AQP1 is known. Identification of the Colton blood group antigen on the extracellular domain of AQP1 allowed identification of rare individuals who are AQP1-null and manifest a subclinical form of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Thirteen homologous proteins exist in humans. Some transport only water (aquaporins); others transport water plus glycerol (aquaglyceroporins). These proteins are required for generation of physiological fluids (urine, cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous humor, sweat, saliva, and tears). Involvement of aquaporins in multiple clinical states is becoming recognized--renal concentration, fluid retention, blindness, skin hydration, brain edema, thermal stress, glucose homeostasis, malaria, and even arsenic poisoning. Aquaporins are particularly important in plant biology. This information now provides the challenge of developing new technologies to manipulate aquaporins for clinical or agricultural benefits.
Subjects: Aquaporins
Biological Transport
Water--metabolism
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcast
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[64k]  [150k]  [240k]  [440k]  [740k]  [1040k]  [1240k]  [1440k]  [1840k]    How to download a Videocast
Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QU 55.7
NLM ID: 101671854
CIT Live ID: 16898
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=16898