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The Mechanisms of Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins

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Air date: Wednesday, October 29, 2014, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 356, (121 Live, 235 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:04:55
Description: Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

The Annual DeWitt Stetten, Jr., Lecture

Movement is a fundamental property of living organisms. The contraction of muscles, beating of cilia and flagella, segregation of genetic material during mitosis, and intracellular transport of membranes, proteins and mRNAs are driven by molecular motor proteins that move along cytoskeletal filaments. Dr. Vale's laboratory, whose research is funded by NIH, has studied kinesin and dynein, the two types of motors that move along microtubule tracks. The mechanism of kinesin is reasonably well understood through measurements of its single molecule motility and the elucidation of its atomic structure. Dynein, a much larger motor that is evolutionarily unrelated to kinesin, is not as well understood. In his lecture, Dr. Vale will describe his lab's recent efforts to understand how structural changes in the dynein motor produce motility and how that motility might be regulated. He will also briefly discuss his Web-based science and education outreach project—iBiology.org, which is funded jointly by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the National Science Foundation.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov
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NLM Title: The mechanisms of cytoskeletal motor proteins / Ron Vale.
Author: Vale, Ronald.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Movement is a fundamental property of living organisms. The contraction of muscles, beating of cilia and flagella, segregation of genetic material during mitosis, and intracellular transport of membranes, proteins and mRNAs are driven by molecular motor proteins that move along cytoskeletal filaments. Dr. Vale's laboratory, whose research is funded by NIH, has studied kinesin and dynein, the two types of motors that move along microtubule tracks. The mechanism of kinesin is reasonably well understood through measurements of its single molecule motility and the elucidation of its atomic structure. Dynein, a much larger motor that is evolutionarily unrelated to kinesin, is not as well understood. In his lecture, Dr. Vale will describe his lab's recent efforts to understand how structural changes in the dynein motor produce motility and how that motility might be regulated. He will also briefly discuss his Web-based science and education outreach project--iBiology.org, which is funded jointly by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the National Science Foundation.
Subjects: Cytoskeletal Proteins--physiology
Movement--physiology
Muscle Proteins--physiology
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: QU 55.3
NLM ID: 101647948
CIT Live ID: 15110
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18699