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Genes versus Fast Foods: Eat, Drink and Be Wary

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Air date: Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 210 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:55:59
Description: Lecture Summary:
Insufficient time has elapsed for our genomes to adapt to the caloric abundance and reduced physical activity accompanying industrialization. Diseases of dietary excess, rather than nutritional deficiency are the major causes of death and disability in the Western world. Using human genetics, we have identified new genes and sequence variations conferring susceptibility (and resistance) to metabolic disorders associated with diabetes and heart disease.

Lecture Objectives:
1. Review strategies used to identify genetic variants contributing to common diseases associated with dietary excess.

2. Demonstrate role of genes involved in lipid metabolism in susceptibility (and resistance) to metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

3. Appreciate how human genetics can provide mechanistic insights into the relationship between phenotypes and diseases.

The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
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NLM Title: Genes versus fast foods : eat, drink and be wary / Helen Hobbs.
Author: Hobbs, Helen H.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Lecture Summary: Insufficient time has elapsed for our genomes to adapt to the caloric abundance and reduced physical activity accompanying industrialization. Diseases of dietary excess, rather than nutritional deficiency are the major causes of death and disability in the Western world. Using human genetics, we have identified new genes and sequence variations conferring susceptibility (and resistance) to metabolic disorders associated with diabetes and heart disease. Lecture Objectives: 1. Review strategies used to identify genetic variants contributing to common diseases associated with dietary excess. 2. Demonstrate role of genes involved in lipid metabolism in susceptibility (and resistance) to metabolic and cardiovascular disease. 3. Appreciate how human genetics can provide mechanistic insights into the relationship between phenotypes and diseases. The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
Subjects: Coronary Disease--etiology
Fast Foods--adverse effects
Fatty Liver--etiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Publication Types: Lecture
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: WI 700
NLM ID: 101549263
CIT Live ID: 9532
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?16278

 

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