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Quantitative Peptidomics to Define the Function of Endogenous Neuropeptides and Peptidases: Implications in Obesity

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Air date: Friday, October 6, 2006, 10:00:00 AM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 12 * This only includes stats from October 2011 and forward.
Category: Proteomics
Runtime: 01:21:49
Description: Neuropeptides perform a large variety of functions as intercellular signaling molecules. To study peptides using “proteomic” approaches, it is necessary to make several modifications in order to detect, identify, and quantify the peptides. For example, peptidomics studies usually analyze the native peptide forms in a tissue, not tryptic fragments, and this complicates sequence analysis. Also, postmortem degradation of proteins in a sample needs to be greatly reduced in order to allow detection of neuropeptides, which are typically present at very low levels. Quantitative peptidomic studies generally use differential isotopic tags to label two sets of extracted peptides, as done with proteomic studies, except that the thiol-based reagents typically used for quantitation of proteins are not suitable because most peptides lack Cys residues.

For more information, visit
http://proteome.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Quantitative peptidomics to define the function of endogenous neuropeptides and peptidases : implications in obesity [electronic resource] / Lloyd Fricker.
Author: Fricker, Lloyd D.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Neuropeptides perform a large variety of functions as intercellular signaling molecules. To study peptides using "proteomic" approaches, it is necessary to make several modifications in order to detect, identify, and quantify the peptides. For example, peptidomics studies usually analyze the native peptide forms in a tissue, not tryptic fragments, and this complicates sequence analysis. Also, postmortem degradation of proteins in a sample needs to be greatly reduced in order to allow detection of neuropeptides, which are typically present at very low levels. Quantitative peptidomic studies generally use differential isotopic tags to label two sets of extracted peptides, as done with proteomic studies, except that the thiol-based reagents typically used for quantitation of proteins are not suitable because most peptides lack Cys residues.
Subjects: Biomarkers
Neuropeptides--genetics
Obesity--genetics
Proteomics--methods
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Rights: This is a work of the United States Government.
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NLM Classification: WD 210
NLM ID: 101294512
CIT Live ID: 5408
Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?13408