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ENVIRONMENTS, INFLAMMATION, TRANSGENERATIONAL PERPETUATION OF DISPARITIES IN HEALTH

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Air date: Tuesday, November 15, 2011, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 56, (1 Live, 55 On-demand)
Category: BSSR - Behavioral and Social Sciences
Runtime: 00:59:44
Description: Inflammation is an important part of human immune defenses against infectious disease, but recent research has implicated dysregulated inflammation in the pathophysiology of a wide range of chronic degenerative diseases, as well as adverse birth outcomes. Current understandings of the links between inflammation and disease are based primarily on research in post- epidemiologic transition populations with high levels of overweight/obesity, and low levels of infectious exposures.

This presentation applies a populations- based, developmental, ecological framework to the study of inflammation in humans, and suggests that environments in infancy are critical to defining how inflammation is regulated in adulthood. The impact of early environments in turn modifies responsiveness to inflammatory stressors later in life, pointing toward a potentially important mechanism in the intergenerational transmission of disparities in health.
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NLM Title: Environments, inflammation, transgenerational perpetuation of disparities in health [electronic resource] / Thomas McDade.
Series: BSSR lecture
Author: McDade, Thomas.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): BSSR lecture
Abstract: (CIT): Inflammation is an important part of human immune defenses against infectious disease, but recent research has implicated dysregulated inflammation in the pathophysiology of a wide range of chronic degenerative diseases, as well as adverse birth outcomes. Current understandings of the links between inflammation and disease are based primarily on research in post- epidemiologic transition populations with high levels of overweight/obesity, and low levels of infectious exposures. This presentation applies a populations- based, developmental, ecological framework to the study of inflammation in humans, and suggests that environments in infancy are critical to defining how inflammation is regulated in adulthood. The impact of early environments in turn modifies responsiveness to inflammatory stressors later in life, pointing toward a potentially important mechanism in the intergenerational transmission of disparities in health.
Subjects: Disease--etiology
Environmental Exposure
Health Status Disparities
Infant
Inflammation--complications
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QZ 150
NLM ID: 101574494
CIT Live ID: 10804
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?16989