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Telomerase and the Consequences of Telomere Dysfunction

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Air date: Tuesday, January 19, 2010, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: Special
Runtime: 01:10:47
Description: National Human Genome Research Institute Division of Intramural Research

The Seventh Annual Jeffrey M. Trent Lectureship in Cancer Research

Carol Greider, Ph.D.

Daniel Nathans Professor and Director, Department of Molecular Biology and Medicine The Johns Hopkins Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences

2009 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine

"Telomerase and the Consequences of Telomere Dysfunction"

About the Lecturer

Dr. Greider received her B.A. from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1983 and her Ph.D. in 1987 from the University of California at Berkeley. In 1984, working together with Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, she discovered telomerase, an enzyme that maintains telomeres, or chromosome ends.

Dr. Greider first isolated and characterized telomerase from the ciliate Tetrahymena. In 1988, as an independent Cold Spring Harbor Fellow, she cloned and characterized the RNA component of telomerase. In 1990, Dr. Greider was appointed as an Assistant Investigator at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and became an Investigator in 1994. She expanded the focus of her telomere research to include the role of telomere length in cell senescence, cell death, and cancer. Together with Dr. Calvin Harley, she showed that human telomeres shorten progressively in primary human cells. This work, along with work of other researchers, led to the idea that telomere maintenance and telomerase may play important roles in cellular senescence and cancer.

In 1997, Dr. Greider moved her laboratory to the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In 1999, she was appointed Professor and, in 2004, she was appointed the Daniel Nathans Professor and Director of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics. Once at Hopkins, Dr. Greider's group continued to study the biochemistry of telomerase and determined the secondary structure of human telomerase RNA. She also expanded her work on a mouse model of dyskeratosis congenita and stem cell failure in response to short telomeres. Dr. Greider currently studies both the biochemistry of telomeres and telomerase, as well as the cellular organismal consequences of short telomeres.

Dr. Greider has won numerous prestigious awards for her work on telomerase, including the Gairdner Foundation Award in 1998, the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2006, and the Dickson Prize in Medicine in 2007. This past year, she accepted the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize and the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize.

On October 5, 2009, Dr. Grieder was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase.

About the Jeffrey M. Trent Lectureship in Cancer Research

Dr. Trent was the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) founding Scientific Director, serving in this role for more than nine years. His leadership and vision was instrumental in establishing NHGRI's Division of Intramural Research as one of the premier research programs in the world devoted to genetics and genomics. In recognition of his significant contributions to the research environment at NIH, NHGRI established the annual Jeffrey M. Trent Lectureship in Cancer Research in 2003. This lecture is given by a prominent cancer researcher who brings the kind of energy, creativity and enthusiasm to cancer research that Dr. Trent has exemplified throughout his career.
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NLM Title: Telomerase and the consequences of telomere dysfunction [electronic resource] / Carol Greider.
Series: Jeffrey M. Trent lectureship in cancer research
Author: Greider, Carol W.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Jeffrey M. Trent lectureship in cancer research
Abstract: (CIT): National Human Genome Research Institute Division of Intramural Research The Seventh Annual Jeffrey M. Trent Lectureship in Cancer Research Carol Greider, Ph.D. Daniel Nathans Professor and Director, Department of Molecular Biology and Medicine The Johns Hopkins Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences 2009 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine "Telomerase and the Consequences of Telomere Dysfunction" About the Lecturer Dr. Greider received her B.A. from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1983 and her Ph.D. in 1987 from the University of California at Berkeley. In 1984, working together with Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, she discovered telomerase, an enzyme that maintains telomeres, or chromosome ends. Dr. Greider first isolated and characterized telomerase from the ciliate Tetrahymena. In 1988, as an independent Cold Spring Harbor Fellow, she cloned and characterized the RNA component of telomerase. In 1990, Dr. Greider was appointed as an Assistant Investigator at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and became an Investigator in 1994. She expanded the focus of her telomere research to include the role of telomere length in cell senescence, cell death, and cancer. Together with Dr. Calvin Harley, she showed that human telomeres shorten progressively in primary human cells. This work, along with work of other researchers, led to the idea that telomere maintenance and telomerase may play important roles in cellular senescence and cancer. In 1997, Dr. Greider moved her laboratory to the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In 1999, she was appointed Professor and, in 2004, she was appointed the Daniel Nathans Professor and Director of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics. Once at Hopkins, Dr. Greider's group continued to study the biochemistry of telomerase and determined the secondary structure of human telomerase RNA. She also expanded her work on a mouse model of dyskeratosis congenita and stem cell failure in response to short telomeres. Dr. Greider currently studies both the biochemistry of telomeres and telomerase, as well as the cellular organismal consequences of short telomeres. Dr. Greider has won numerous prestigious awards for her work on telomerase, including the Gairdner Foundation Award in 1998, the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 2006, and the Dickson Prize in Medicine in 2007. This past year, she accepted the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize and the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize. On October 5, 2009, Dr. Grieder was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase. About the Jeffrey M. Trent Lectureship in Cancer Research Dr. Trent was the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) founding Scientific Director, serving in this role for more than nine years. His leadership and vision was instrumental in establishing NHGRI's Division of Intramural Research as one of the premier research programs in the world devoted to genetics and genomics. In recognition of his significant contributions to the research environment at NIH, NHGRI established the annual Jeffrey M. Trent Lectureship in Cancer Research in 2003. This lecture is given by a prominent cancer researcher who brings the kind of energy, creativity and enthusiasm to cancer research that Dr. Trent has exemplified throughout his career.
Subjects: Telomerase
Telomere--pathology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: QU 141
NLM ID: 101524389
CIT Live ID: 8460
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?15554