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Ancient RNA Relics and Modern Drug Discovery

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Air date: Wednesday, April 21, 2010, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:10:23
Description: Cells control the expression of thousands of genes in response to many chemical and physical signals. Until recently, it was believed that proteins were the near-exclusive mediators of genetic control processes involving metabolite sensing. We have discovered numerous examples of “riboswitches” that act as chemical sensors and as genetic switches. Most riboswitches have been discovered in bacteria, where they control approximately 3% of the genes in some species.

In many instances, riboswitches control the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes. Therefore, compounds that misregulate riboswitch-controlled genes should be candidates for new antibacterial agents. Indeed, recent findings indicate that some riboswitch classes are novel drug targets. Prospects for the development of drugs that trigger riboswitch function will be discussed.

The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
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NLM Title: Ancient RNA relics and modern drug discovery [electronic resource] / Ronald Breaker.
Series: NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series.
Author: Breaker, Ronald.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series.
Abstract: (CIT): Cells control the expression of thousands of genes in response to many chemical and physical signals. Until recently, it was believed that proteins were the near-exclusive mediators of genetic control processes involving metabolite sensing. We have discovered numerous examples of "riboswitches" that act as chemical sensors and as genetic switches. Most riboswitches have been discovered in bacteria, where they control approximately 3% of the genes in some species. In many instances, riboswitches control the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes. Therefore, compounds that misregulate riboswitch-controlled genes should be candidates for new antibacterial agents. Indeed, recent findings indicate that some riboswitch classes are novel drug targets. Prospects for the development of drugs that trigger riboswitch function will be discussed. The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
Subjects: Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Design
RNA
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: QU 58.7
NLM ID: 101531572
CIT Live ID: 8247
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?15840

 

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