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A Fresh Look at Host-Pathogen Interactions: New Tools

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Air date: Wednesday, May 27, 2009, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:56:24
Description: Interactions between pathogens and their hosts are an intricate web of measures and countermeasures, the study of which has uncovered basic mechanisms of how cells operate. My laboratory has been interested in how herpesviruses disable pathways of antigen presentation, an effort that has shed light on mechanisms of glycoprotein quality control and turnover.

Our studies rely on protein modification to visualize cells and proteins within them, and to control their functional properties. This can be done genetically through fusions with fluorescent reporter proteins. Alternatively, installation of tags that can be detected with antibodies or upon chemoenzymatic conversion with colored or fluorescent reporters allows visualization of the proteins of interest. I shall describe sortagging, a new method that exploits a sortase-catalyzed transacylation reaction as a straightforward method to produce proteins labeled in solution or on the surface of cells in site-specific fashion at the C- or the N-terminus. This method of protein labeling succeeds where GFP fails, as in the case of many type II membrane proteins, and further allows the installation of functional groups that cannot be encoded genetically. A related strategy is used to produce circular proteins in high yields, with improvement of stability of the proteins in question as a possible application.

Finally, I shall report results from recent experiments, conducted in collaboration with the laboratory of Rudolf Jaenisch, that exploit somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate new mouse models for infectious disease. By reprogramming the nucleus of an antigen specific T cell, isolated from a mouse actively resolving a virus or parasite infection, embryonic stem cells can be obtained that are capable of transmitting through the germline the rearranged T cell receptor genes harbored by the donor T cell. These mice carry in all of their somatic cells, including T cells, the rearrangements in question, generated

The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
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NLM Title: A fresh look at host-pathogen interactions : new tools [electronic resource] / Hidde Ploegh.
Series: NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Author: Ploegh, Hidde L.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Abstract: (CIT): Interactions between pathogens and their hosts are an intricate web of measures and countermeasures, the study of which has uncovered basic mechanisms of how cells operate. My laboratory has been interested in how herpesviruses disable pathways of antigen presentation, an effort that has shed light on mechanisms of glycoprotein quality control and turnover. Our studies rely on protein modification to visualize cells and proteins within them, and to control their functional properties. This can be done genetically through fusions with fluorescent reporter proteins. Alternatively, installation of tags that can be detected with antibodies or upon chemoenzymatic conversion with colored or fluorescent reporters allows visualization of the proteins of interest. I shall describe sortagging, a new method that exploits a sortase-catalyzed transacylation reaction as a straightforward method to produce proteins labeled in solution or on the surface of cells in site-specific fashion at the C- or the N-terminus. This method of protein labeling succeeds where GFP fails, as in the case of many type II membrane proteins, and further allows the installation of functional groups that cannot be encoded genetically. A related strategy is used to produce circular proteins in high yields, with improvement of stability of the proteins in question as a possible application. Finally, I shall report results from recent experiments, conducted in collaboration with the laboratory of Rudolf Jaenisch, that exploit somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate new mouse models for infectious disease. By reprogramming the nucleus of an antigen specific T cell, isolated from a mouse actively resolving a virus or parasite infection, embryonic stem cells can be obtained that are capable of transmitting through the germline the rearranged T cell receptor genes harbored by the donor T cell. These mice carry in all of their somatic cells, including T cells, the rearrangements in question, generated.
Subjects: Herpesviridae--physiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions--immunology
Immunity, Cellular--physiology
Toll-Like Receptors--immunology
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Peptides and Proteins--immunology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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NLM Classification: QW 165.5.H3
NLM ID: 101507216
CIT Live ID: 7048
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?15120

 

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