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Imaging the Addicted Brain: From Molecules to Behavior

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Air date: Wednesday, April 05, 2006, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:11:25
Description: Imaging technology has played a pivotal role in advancing our understanding of the neurochemical and functional changes that characterize the addicted brain. Although the involvement of dopamine in drug reinforcement is well recognized, its role in drug addiction is much less clear. Imaging studies have shown that the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse in humans are contingent upon large and fast increases in dopamine that mimic but exceed in the intensity and duration those induced by dopamine cell firing to environmental events.

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The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
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NLM Title: Imaging the addicted brain : from molecules to behavior [electronic resource] / Nora Volkow.
Series: NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Author: Volkow, Nora D.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH director's Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Abstract: (CIT): Imaging technology has played a pivotal role in advancing our understanding of the neurochemical and functional changes that characterize the addicted brain. Although the involvement of dopamine in drug reinforcement is well recognized, its role in drug addiction is much less clear. Imaging studies have shown that the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse in humans are contingent upon large and fast increases in dopamine that mimic but exceed in the intensity and duration those induced by dopamine cell firing to environmental events.
Subjects: Brain--drug effects
Brain--radionuclide imaging
Receptors, Dopamine D2--metabolism
Substance-Related Disorders--physiopathology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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NLM Classification: WM 270
NLM ID: 101289632
CIT Live ID: 4284
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?13146

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