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Epidemiology: Back to Translation

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Air date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 422, (233 Live, 189 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 00:54:15
Description: Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Annual Robert S. Gordon Lecture

Epidemiology was born of the need to discover the evidence necessary for the practice of public health. Early generations of epidemiologists produced data with the objective of translating these data into public health action. However, the need for epidemiology to establish its scientific credentials and the fact that subsequent generations of epidemiologists lacked a public health background eventually resulted in an almost exclusive focus on etiology. Over the last few decades, a wealth of evidence on etiology and disease mechanisms has been produced, but with relatively less attention to the application of this evidence to the development of health policies. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in translational and implementation science, making the time ripe for a rebirth of translational epidemiology. After a short discussion of the definition of translational epidemiology, concepts relevant to it will be discussed, including the importance of the latency period, the main prevention strategies, etiological confounding versus public health confounding, the primacy of the additive model for prevention, issues related to consistency of findings, and decision analysis. Finally, a comparison will be made between translational and “academic” epidemiology.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Epidemiology : back to translation / Moyses Szklo.
Series: Wednesday afternoon lecture series. Annual Robert S. Gordon lecture
Author: Szklo, M.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.),
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Wednesday afternoon lecture series. Annual Robert S. Gordon lecture
Abstract: (CIT): Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Annual Robert S. Gordon Lecture Epidemiology was born of the need to discover the evidence necessary for the practice of public health. Early generations of epidemiologists produced data with the objective of translating these data into public health action. However, the need for epidemiology to establish its scientific credentials and the fact that subsequent generations of epidemiologists lacked a public health background eventually resulted in an almost exclusive focus on etiology. Over the last few decades, a wealth of evidence on etiology and disease mechanisms has been produced, but with relatively less attention to the application of this evidence to the development of health policies. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in translational and implementation science, making the time ripe for a rebirth of translational epidemiology. After a short discussion of the definition of translational epidemiology, concepts relevant to it will be discussed, including the importance of the latency period, the main prevention strategies, etiological confounding versus public health confounding, the primacy of the additive model for prevention, issues related to consistency of findings, and decision analysis. Finally, a comparison will be made between translational and "academic" epidemiology.
Subjects: Communication
Epidemiologic Methods
Health Policy
Translational Medical Research
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
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NLM Classification: WA 950
NLM ID: 101619331
CIT Live ID: 13194
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18114