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The Obesity Epidemic: Why Have We Failed?

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Air date: Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 876, (333 Live, 543 On-demand)
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:07:02
Description: Lewis Kuller will discuss how obesity is an example of a common source epidemic due to changes or introduction of new behaviors, i.e. lifestyles, which result in introduction of new "agents," such as fast foods or calorically dense foods, into a receptive environment. The development of technology for mass production of low-cost, high-calorically dense foods has resulted in economic advantage, mass marketing, and social acceptability. Over time, this has caused increased risks of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, etc. Successful control of the obesity epidemic requires an understanding of the interrelationship between the host, the agents and the environmental factors.

The NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.

For more information, visit:
The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series
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NLM Title: The obesity epidemic : why have we failed? [electronic resource] / Lewis H. Kuller.
Series: Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Author: Kuller, Lewis H.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Wednesday afternoon lecture series
Abstract: (CIT): Lewis Kuller will discuss how obesity is an example of a common source epidemic due to changes or introduction of new behaviors, i.e. lifestyles, which result in introduction of new "agents," such as fast foods or calorically dense foods, into a receptive environment. The development of technology for mass production of low-cost, high-calorically dense foods has resulted in economic advantage, mass marketing, and social acceptability. Over time, this has caused increased risks of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, etc. Successful control of the obesity epidemic requires an understanding of the interrelationship between the host, the agents and the environmental factors.
Subjects: Health Behavior
Obesity--epidemiology
Obesity--etiology
Socioeconomic Factors
United States--epidemiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WD 210
NLM ID: 101581451
CIT Live ID: 10495
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?17113

 

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