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Antipoverty Vaccines for the World's Neglected Diseases

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Air date: Wednesday, June 06, 2012, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 245, (125 Live, 120 On-demand)
Category: Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:04:14
Description: The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) represent the most common infections affecting the estimated 100 million people living below the poverty line in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region. An additional five million people live in poverty in the state of Texas, especially in South Texas. Almost all of the “bottom 100 million” (as well as many of the five million Texans living in poverty) are affected by one or more NTD caused by hookworm and other intestinal helminth infections, lymphatic filariasis, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and neglected bacterial and viral infections such as leptospirosis, yellow fever, and dengue. Mass administration of donated and low-cost generic NTD drugs has eliminated selected NTDs in certain LAC countries. Specifically, schistosomiasis has been eliminated in the Caribbean region; LF in Costa Rica, Suriname, and Trinidad; Trachoma in Mexico; onchoerciasis in the six remaining endemic LAC countries; and leprosy throughout the LAC (except for Brazil). Moreover, great strides have been made in eliminating Chagas disease in the Southern Cone of LAC. There is an urgent need to expand mass drug administration efforts through support of government and agencies such as USAID, and a LAC NTD fund sponsored jointly by the Interamerican Development Bank, PAHO, and the Global Network for NTDs. However, it will be necessary to simultaneously develop and test control tools such as new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for many of the NTDs. Several “antipoverty vaccines” targeting NTDs are currently under development and undergoing clinical testing through the activities of academic institutions and product development partnerships (PDPs) in collaboration with developing country manufacturers and partners in Brazil (FIOCRUZ, FIOCRUZ-BioManguinhos, Instituto Butantan), Mexico (CINVESTAV, Birmex), Cuba, and elsewhere. Together these organizations are leading a path for innovation to produce new vaccines for Chagas disease, cysticercosis, dengue, fascioliasis, hookworm, leishmaniasis, leprosy, leptospirosis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, and yellow fever. Beyond direct vaccine development, it will be essential to implement global access strategies for these new potentially life saving products, which ultimately could facilitate the elimination of several key NTDs that pose public health problems in the LAC region.

The NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.

For more information, visit:
The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series
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NLM Title: Antipoverty vaccines for the world's neglected diseases [electronic resource] / Peter J. Hotez.
Series: Eliminting the NTDs through new 'antipoverty vaccines'
Author: Hotez, Peter J.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Eliminting the NTDs through new 'antipoverty vaccines'
Abstract: (CIT): The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) represent the most common infections affecting the estimated 100 million people living below the poverty line in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region. An additional five million people live in poverty in the state of Texas, especially in South Texas. Almost all of the "bottom 100 million" (as well as many of the five million Texans living in poverty) are affected by one or more NTD caused by hookworm and other intestinal helminth infections, lymphatic filariasis, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and neglected bacterial and viral infections such as leptospirosis, yellow fever, and dengue. Mass administration of donated and low-cost generic NTD drugs has eliminated selected NTDs in certain LAC countries. Specifically, schistosomiasis has been eliminated in the Caribbean region; LF in Costa Rica, Suriname, and Trinidad; Trachoma in Mexico; onchoerciasis in the six remaining endemic LAC countries; and leprosy throughout the LAC (except for Brazil). Moreover, great strides have been made in eliminating Chagas disease in the Southern Cone of LAC. There is an urgent need to expand mass drug administration efforts through support of government and agencies such as USAID, and a LAC NTD fund sponsored jointly by the Interamerican Development Bank, PAHO, and the Global Network for NTDs. However, it will be necessary to simultaneously develop and test control tools such as new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for many of the NTDs. Several "antipoverty vaccines" targeting NTDs are currently under development and undergoing clinical testing through the activities of academic institutions and product development partnerships (PDPs) in collaboration with developing country manufacturers and partners in Brazil (FIOCRUZ, FIOCRUZ-BioManguinhos, Instituto Butantan), Mexico (CINVESTAV, Birmex), Cuba, and elsewhere. Together these organizations are leading a path for innovation to produce new vaccines for Chagas disease, cysticercosis, dengue, fascioliasis, hookworm, leishmaniasis, leprosy, leptospirosis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, and yellow fever. Beyond direct vaccine development, it will be essential to implement global access strategies for these new potentially life saving products, which ultimately could facilitate the elimination of several key NTDs that pose public health problems in the LAC region. The NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide. For more information, visit: The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series.
Subjects: Anthelmintics
Helminthiasis
Neglected Diseases--prevention & control
Poverty
Tropical Medicine
Vaccines
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WC 680
NLM ID: 101587419
CIT Live ID: 10527
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?17303

 

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