Skip Navigation


CIT can broadcast your seminar, conference or meeting live to a world-wide audience over the Internet as a real-time streaming video. The event can be recorded and made available for viewers to watch at their convenience as an on-demand video or a downloadable podcast. CIT can also broadcast NIH-only or HHS-only content.

Catalytic and Gene Regulatory RNAs: Structural Biology, Physiology, and Evolution

Loading video...

182 Views  
   
Air date: Friday, March 16, 2012, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 182, (2 Live, 180 On-demand)
Category: NIH Director's Seminars
Runtime: 00:54:41
Description: NIH Director's Seminar Series

Education: Adrian Ferré-D'Amaré received his B.S. in chemistry from the Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey, in Mexico, and his Ph.D. in molecular biophysics from the Rockefeller University. He has been named a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar and a W.M. Keck Foundation Distinguished Young Scholar in Medical Research.

Research Interests:
Despite its chemical simplicity (compared to proteins) RNA can fold into intricate three-dimensional structures that can recognize other RNAs, proteins and small molecules with high affinity and specificity and carry out biological catalysis. We employ structural, biophysical, biochemical, and in vitro genetic techniques, as well as chemical synthesis, to study ribozymes, riboswitches, and ribonucleoprotein complexes.

We study ribozymes (catalytic RNAs), both cellular and in vitro selected, because they starkly demonstrate the chemical versatility of this nucleic acid. We study riboswitches. These are RNA elements of non-coding regions of messenger RNAs that can switch between two functional states, depending on whether they are bound to a metabolite. Riboswitches are used by bacteria and eukaryotes to regulate gene expression at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational levels. We study protein enzymes responsible for post-transcriptional modification of RNAs. These modifications expand the chemical repertoire of the nucleic acid; the enzymes responsible may also serve as chaperones, facilitating RNA folding in vivo. We study a family of protein enzymes called pseudouridine synthases. These are responsible for the most abundant and phylogenetically conserved modification of cellular RNAs.

For more information, visit: http://www.nih.gov/about/director/dirsem.htm
Debug: Show Debug
NLM Title: Catalytic and gene regulatory RNAs : structural biology, physiology, and evolution [electronic resource] / Adrian Ferre-D'Amare.
Series: NIH director's seminar series
Author: Ferre-D'Amare, Adrian.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH director's seminar series
Abstract: (CIT): NIH Director's Seminar Series Education: Adrian Ferre-D'Amare received his B.S. in chemistry from the Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey, in Mexico, and his Ph.D. in molecular biophysics from the Rockefeller University. He has been named a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar and a W.M. Keck Foundation Distinguished Young Scholar in Medical Research. Research Interests: Despite its chemical simplicity (compared to proteins) RNA can fold into intricate three-dimensional structures that can recognize other RNAs, proteins and small molecules with high affinity and specificity and carry out biological catalysis. We employ structural, biophysical, biochemical, and in vitro genetic techniques, as well as chemical synthesis, to study ribozymes, riboswitches, and ribonucleoprotein complexes. We study ribozymes (catalytic RNAs), both cellular and in vitro selected, because they starkly demonstrate the chemical versatility of this nucleic acid. We study riboswitches. These are RNA elements of non-coding regions of messenger RNAs that can switch between two functional states, depending on whether they are bound to a metabolite. Riboswitches are used by bacteria and eukaryotes to regulate gene expression at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational levels. We study protein enzymes responsible for post-transcriptional modification of RNAs. These modifications expand the chemical repertoire of the nucleic acid; the enzymes responsible may also serve as chaperones, facilitating RNA folding in vivo. We study a family of protein enzymes called pseudouridine synthases. These are responsible for the most abundant and phylogenetically conserved modification of cellular RNAs. For more information, visit: http://www.nih.gov/about/director/dirsem.htm.
Subjects: RNA
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[256k]  [512k]    How to download a Videocast
Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: QU 58.7
NLM ID: 101581486
CIT Live ID: 10758
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?17170