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Self Stimulation—How Positive Feedback Loops Wire the Brain

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Air date: Wednesday, May 09, 2012, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views: Total views: 467, (126 Live, 341 On-demand)
Category: Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:10:08
Description: A great deal of brain development happens after birth. During this period, sensory inputs and patterns of activity within the brain drive the refinement of circuits and the formation of synapses. This is well established for parts of the brain that receive signals from the outside world, such as sensory systems. Much less is known about the function of activity in shaping the development of non-sensory and sub-cortical systems. Dr. Sabatini will show that activity in a recurrent loop between the basal ganglia and cortex acts in a self-reinforcing manner. Thus manipulations that promote the activity of the direct pathway through the basal ganglia, and hence activate cortex, lead to greater innervation of the basal ganglia. His lab proposes that such self-reinforcing systems ensure the correct wiring of sub-cortical systems that lack the stereotyped topographic organization of sensory systems. Lastly, his lab proposes that early perturbations of such mechanisms can contribute to developmental disorders such as cerebral palsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

The NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.

For more information, visit:
The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series
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NLM Title: Self stimulation : how positive feedback loops wire the brain [electronic resource] / Bernardo L. Sabatini.
Series: NIH Wednesday afternoon lecture
Author: Sabatini, Bernardo.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH Wednesday afternoon lecture
Abstract: (CIT): A great deal of brain development happens after birth. During this period, sensory inputs and patterns of activity within the brain drive the refinement of circuits and the formation of synapses. This is well established for parts of the brain that receive signals from the outside world, such as sensory systems. Much less is known about the function of activity in shaping the development of non-sensory and sub-cortical systems. Dr. Sabatini will show that activity in a recurrent loop between the basal ganglia and cortex acts in a self-reinforcing manner. Thus manipulations that promote the activity of the direct pathway through the basal ganglia, and hence activate cortex, lead to greater innervation of the basal ganglia. His lab proposes that such self-reinforcing systems ensure the correct wiring of sub-cortical systems that lack the stereotyped topographic organization of sensory systems. Lastly, his lab proposes that early perturbations of such mechanisms can contribute to developmental disorders such as cerebral palsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide. For more information, visit: The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series.
Subjects: Brain--physiology
Feedback
Psychophysiology--methods
Self Stimulation--physiology
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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Caption Text: Download Caption File
NLM Classification: WL 103
NLM ID: 101585257
CIT Live ID: 10523
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?17254

 

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