Skip Navigation


CIT can broadcast your seminar, conference or meeting live to a world-wide audience over the Internet as a real-time streaming video. The event can be recorded and made available for viewers to watch at their convenience as an on-demand video or a downloadable podcast. CIT can also broadcast NIH-only or HHS-only content.

The Paradox of Immunity

Loading video...

 
   
Air date: Wednesday, March 10, 2010, 3:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
Views:  
Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures
Runtime: 01:16:59
Description: Following postdoctoral studies at the NIH with Dr. Phil Leder, where he identified and characterized the genes for the human IgM antibody and the DNA elements involved in switch recombination, in 1982 Dr. Ravetch joined the faculty of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell Medical College. His laboratory cloned the first genes for Fc receptors, identified the SHIP inhibitory receptor signaling pathway and contributed significantly to understanding the mechanisms of antibody mediated effector responses, establishing the FcR pathways as fundamental components of the immune response. In addition to his studies on antibody receptors, Dr. Ravetch has made fundamental contributions to the genetics of the malaria parasite and with the identification of the first chemokine, IP-10, established this class of molecules as novel mediators of inflammation. He returned to The Rockefeller University in 1996 to establish the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology.

The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
Debug: Show Debug
NLM Title: The paradox of immunity [electronic resource] / Jeffrey Ravetch.
Series: NIH Wednesday afternoon lecture series. Dyer lecture
Author: Ravetch, J V.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): NIH Wednesday afternoon lecture series. Dyer lecture
Abstract: (CIT): Following postdoctoral studies at the NIH with Dr. Phil Leder, where he identified and characterized the genes for the human IgM antibody and the DNA elements involved in switch recombination, in 1982 Dr. Ravetch joined the faculty of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell Medical College. His laboratory cloned the first genes for Fc receptors, identified the SHIP inhibitory receptor signaling pathway and contributed significantly to understanding the mechanisms of antibody mediated effector responses, establishing the FcR pathways as fundamental components of the immune response. In addition to his studies on antibody receptors, Dr. Ravetch has made fundamental contributions to the genetics of the malaria parasite and with the identification of the first chemokine, IP-10, established this class of molecules as novel mediators of inflammation. He returned to The Rockefeller University in 1996 to establish the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology. The NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series includes weekly scientific talks by some of the top researchers in the biomedical sciences worldwide.
Subjects: Autoantibodies
Autoimmunity
Immunity
Immunoglobulin G
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[256k]  [512k]    How to download a Videocast
NLM Classification: QW 545
NLM ID: 101528425
CIT Live ID: 8239
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?15704

 

Podcast information
Audio Podcasts   Video Podcasts
  Description Runtime     Description Runtime
Listen to the podcast Enhanced Audio Podcast 1:16:53   Watch the podcast Enhanced Video Podcast 1:16:53