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Forward Genetics Reveals Novel Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

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Air date: Monday, June 01, 2009, 12:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: Neuroscience
Runtime: 00:58:29
Description: Dr. Ackerman received her Ph.D. from UCLA and did postdoctoral training at the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wistar Institute. She was a visiting scientist at the Max Planck Institute in Freiburg. She joined the Jackson Laboratory in 1993 and has been a Hughes Investigator since 2005. She has served as a member of the NIH Developmental Brain Disorders Study Section and is currently a member of the NINDS Board of Scientific Counselors. Dr. Ackerman's laboratory focuses on the investigation of mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of neurons in the cerebellum. She uses a mouse model system to identify genes that are required for the proper migration of neurons from where they are formed to where they will function in the adult. In addition, she is analyzing mice with mutations that contribute to neurodegeneration to better understand how neurons are lost in the aging mammalian brain. Current research efforts focus on the roles of oxidative stress and protein misfolding in aging and neurodegenerative disease.

Selected Publications:

Ackerman SL, Kozak LP, Przyborski SA, Rund LA, Boyer BB, Knowles BB. 1997. The mouse rostral cerebellar malformation gene encodes an UNC-5-like protein. Nature 386: 838-842.

Klein JA, Longo-Guess CM, Rossmann MP, Seburn KL, Hurd RE, Frankel WN, Bronson RT, Ackerman SL. 2002. The harlequin mouse mutation down-regulates apoptosis-inducing factor. Nature 419:367-374.

Zhao L, Longo-Guess C, Harris BS, Lee JW, Ackerman SL. 2005. Protein accumulation and neurodegeneration in the woozy mutant mouse is caused by disruption of SIL1, a cochaperone of BiP. Nat Genet 37:974-979.

Lee JW, Beebe K, Nangle LA, Jang J, Longo-Guess CM, Cook SA, Davisson MT, Schimmel P, Ackerman SL. 2006. Editing-defective tRNA synthetase causes protein misfolding and neurodegeneration. Nature 443:50-55.

Ishimura R, Martin GR, Ackerman SL. 2008. Loss of apoptosis inducing factor results in cell type-specific neurogenesis defects. J Neurosci. 28:4938-4948.

For more information see our website -http://neuroseries.info.nih.gov
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NLM Title: Forward genetics reveals novel mechanisms of neurodegeneration [electronic resource] / Susan Ackerman.
Author: Ackerman, Susan.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Abstract: (CIT): Dr. Ackerman's laboratory focuses on the investigation of mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of neurons in the cerebellum. She uses a mouse model system to identify genes that are required for the proper migration of neurons from where they are formed to where they will function in the adult. In addition, she is analyzing mice with mutations that contribute to neurodegeneration to better understand how neurons are lost in the aging mammalian brain. Current research efforts focus on the roles of oxidative stress and protein misfolding in aging and neurodegenerative disease.
Subjects: Cerebellum--pathology
Mice, Neurologic Mutants
Nerve Degeneration
Neuronal Migration Disorders
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
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NLM Classification: WL 320
NLM ID: 101510683
CIT Live ID: 7150
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?15141

 

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