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Getting at Why People Change

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Air date: Wednesday, February 27, 2008, 1:00:00 PM
Time displayed is Eastern Time, Washington DC Local
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Category: Special
Runtime: 01:59:38
Description: SPRING 2008 SYMPOSIA SERIES ON MECHANISMS OF BEHAVIOR CHANGE

Getting Back to Basics: Using Basic Behavioral Research to Study Mechanisms of Clinical Change

Moderator: Mark L. Willenbring, M.D.
Director, Division of Treatment and Recovery Research, NIAAA, NIH

Getting Back to Basics:
Using Basic Behavioral Research to
Study Mechanisms of Clinical Change
Matthew K. Nock, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
Harvard University

Translation Science Framework: Using Basic Behavioral Research to Identify Clinically Significant Mechanisms of Behavioral Change
Marsha E. Bates, Ph.D.,
Research Professor
Center for Alcohol Studies
Rutgers University

Matthew K. Nock, Ph.D., is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and Director of the Laboratory for Clinical and Developmental Research in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. Dr. Nock received his Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University and completed his clinical internship at the NYU Child Study Center-Bellevue Hospital Center. His research focuses primarily on the etiology, assessment, and treatment of self-injurious and aggressive behaviors. Dr. Nock has authored more than 70 scientific papers on these topics, and his research is currently funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the Talley and Clark Funds at Harvard University. In addition to his research and clinical work, Dr. Nock teaches courses at Harvard on self-destructive behaviors, statistics, research methodology, developmental psychopathology, and cultural diversity.

Marsha E. Bates, Ph.D., is Research Professor of Psychology, Rutgers University, and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She is Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at the Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers University. Dr. Bates is Past President of Division 50 (Addictions) of the American Psychological Association, Consulting Editor of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol. Her NIAAA and NIDA-supported research program focuses on neurocognitive models of addiction treatment outcome, acute alcohol and placebo effects on memory and emotional regulation, family alcoholism, and the interrelation of memory and arousal at varying developmental stages of drug exposure. Dr. Bates is particularly interested in the translation of basic experimental findings to characterize neurobiological mechanisms that support or hinder behavior change throughout development, and especially as applied to the prevention and treatment of alcohol and other drug use disorders.

Organizing Agencies: AHRQ, NCI, NIAAA, NIDA, OBSSR

For more information, visit
http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/NewsEvents/Conferences/changesymposia08.htm
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NLM Title: Getting at why people change [electronic resource] / Matthew Nock, Marsha Bates.
Series: Mechanisms of behavior change ; 1
Author: Nock, Matthew.
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Publisher:
Other Title(s): Mechanisms of behavior change ; 1
Subjects: Alcohol-Related Disorders
Behavior Control
Behavioral Research
Publication Types: Lectures
Webcasts
Download: To download this event, select one of the available bitrates:
[384k]    How to download a Videocast
NLM Classification: WM 20
NLM ID: 101468749
CIT Live ID: 6612
Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?14331

 

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